Impact Of The Agricultural Revolution In Europe

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Sweeping changes impacted all of Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries; in fact, these two hundred years serve as the bridge between the Medieval Period and the “Modern Era”. Many antiquated systems and structures were eradicated, and in their place(s), new technologies emerged. One of the most significant changes occurred through the agricultural revolution. Ironically, these fundamental changes (in how people met their survival needs) most benefitted the already secure middle class and nobility. In reaction to continued oppression and poverty, and heavily influenced by the ideals of the Enlightenment, the peasants of Europe- in particular France-banded together to demand radical changes in the way society was structured, ultimately leading …show more content…
Villages and people were exposed to diseases, war, and more than often, a life of poverty. Throughout the eleventh and twelfth centuries, local lords owned the land that peasants worked on. Peasants on the land were divided between slaves and serfs. Peasants were not allowed to leave the land their lord’s owned without seeking permission. The serf latter was somewhat freer than slaves, in which serfs could have families while slaves could not. Serfdom was a hereditary process in which one would be tied to their lord’s lands until they could purchase a part of the land, or ended up marrying a free person. Peasants mostly worked somewhere around three to four days on the lord’s land, although during the harvest or plantation periods, they would work for longer. Full-time servants were required to work every day of the week, but would get a break on Sunday’s to attend mass. By the end of the twelfth century and into the thirteenth century, peasants being bound to their lands by lords began to loosen and therefore slowly started to go …show more content…
Other peasants were able to have their own strips of land to work on, separate from the lord’s strips. The heart of peasant life was reliant upon collaboration in order to survive, and peasants spent most of their times and days working on the land. Aside from working all day in the fields, peasants had to tend to the horses and cattle that were grazing in the meadow. If they were lucky, the meadows often led to a forest where peasant would gather survival foods, such as fruits, roots, nuts, and berries. They would fish and hunt to provide the simple diet that their family was accustomed to. Contrary to the views of peasant life in the Middle Ages in modern culture, life was uncomplicated and dull. Most peasants did not have a complicated life, in which they only worked, attended church, and occasionally had a celebration. The barely ever got to travel out of their small villages, but they had a sense of unity within the community. In the event of hardship, they were certain that they could turn to their lords for

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