Thomas Paine's Common Sense Contribution To American Revolution

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Thomas Paine 's Common Sense Contribution To American Revolution
Thomas Paine (1737-1809), famous for his political radicalism ideologies, published Common Sense in 1776. Common Sense was a hugely influential pamphlet urging the end of the British rule on America. Paine can be said to have played the greatest role of convincing the American people to engage in a spirit of revolution rather than rebellion. Rebellion differs from the revolution in that its agenda is resistance to the government while that of revolution is to replace the government. Paine’s approach to revolution and equality among the Americans people created a sense of uneasiness among other revolutionists who were not as generous in their political thought as Paine was. One
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Without, the common sense pamphlet, the revolution course would have taken a different route and time to achieve full American independence. This is after considering that the American culture of heroism, where in challenging times there rises a hero who inspires or saves the people. As the American hero, Paine’s common sense paper inspired major revolutionists activities towards the declaration of independence. The greatest of the events that the common sense pamphlet inspired was the declaration of independence. The declaration of independence was based on the acceptance that all men are equal and deserve as many equal opportunities. The declaration of independence was clear off the monarch ideas of status quo. The pamphlet was all about empowering all on the basis of social, economic platforms. For example, during the American revolution, it is the majority poor who would have played the largest role in the wars. The majority poor needed the necessary inspiration inorder to commit themselves fully to the war. The common sense pamphlet offered the majority poor a reason to engage in war. During the revolution era, there existed four people; the loyalists, colonies elites, the undecided and the patriots. The undecided were the majority poor, for they did not know for whose cause to fight. The undecided also held the power to decide which side of the war won. For example, if the undecided did not fight or commit fully to the war, Britain would have won. On the same note, if the undecided participated fully in the war by defending their American nation for their own sake, America would have won. The Common sense pamphlet convinced the undecided majority why and how urgent they needed to join the patriots in America and fight for their land. Furthermore, the undecided were mainly

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