Impact Of British Rule On India

1103 Words 5 Pages
Introduction: This essay will cover the impact that the rule of the British Empire had on the development of India’s development as a nation. Ruling of the British lasted nearly 90 years from 1858 to 1947, when the English East India Company had established supremacy in Bengal in 1857. The transition from a relationship of trade to direct rule can be explained by the needs of trade. The British began to criticize the prices of textiles, which was the most important item in this trade, and accepted local political circumstances that enabled the British to command land revenues of Bengal as payment. These local circumstances included the support of elites who were disaffected by local rulers. After their monopoly in trade ended in the early …show more content…
In which the smaller communities existed as part of a larger society. Thus, India’s surplus and commodity went towards the cost of the bigger aspect, such as feeding the United Kingdom. However, the government would be suspended above the small communities. Due to the closed nature of the common units, India did not occupy an important or central role in the economy. The essential function for India being; external trade and facilitation under British Rule, in which obeying to the upper hand was critical (Srivastava, 1996). Notably, the impact of the British colonial policy resulted in revenue and restriction of trade for India. Dissolving the self sustaining, rural structure, strengthening money relations, all evidently ruining the skill of India by an extreme extent via direct attacks. Colonialism made every part of India into the capitalist system. Evidently, this separated peak value to be attained (Ram, …show more content…
The indigenous agricultural industry was destroyed by the British insistence on using its Indian colony for maximum monetary gain, which in turned harmed the Indian economy (Chittoor and Aulakh, 2015). However, the development of the vast and intricate railroad network throughout India did bring prosperity and had positive ramifications for Indian society insofar as the Indian regions which were connected via rail were now becoming more cohesive and intertwined socially and culturally (Chakraborty, 2014). The social strata of India was revamped with a new professional social class emerging. This class, although westernised, was able to help modernise India through the development of a higher standard of schools and universities throughout the country, but at the same time being detrimental to the historical social foundation of India (Haswell,

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