Essay The Impact of the Industrial Revolution on Western Society

1381 Words Apr 18th, 2008 6 Pages
The Industrial Revolution had a significant impact on Western society and the effects were numerous and mainly positive. The Industrial Revolution began in England in the 1790’s and spread throughout Europe and eventually to America. The extensive effects of the Industrial Revolution influenced almost every aspect of daily life and human society in some way. During this time period, widespread transportation such as railroads became available and important for the movement of goods and people. Also, new social reforms came about, dealing with critical issues including that of child labor.
In addition, the effects of the revolution resulted in a great improvement in living standards for many people. Although the positive affects of the
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In turn, more factories and machinery needed to be built to keep up with the consumer’s demand for products providing more jobs. The construction of these railways also created jobs for the common people. The increase in job opportunities led to an increase in people who could afford to buy the products, which consequently led to even more factories and employment opportunities. Railroads, in addition to improved roads, canals, and seaports created enormous trade systems that benefited the lower class as opposed to solely the elite resulting in great economic growth in many countries.
During the Industrial Revolution, new social reforms came about, eventually resulting in a positive change for much of European society. Much of these reforms were due to the issue of child labor. Children worked with unsafe machinery in dangerous environments where permanent injury or even death was not uncommon. Many children worked in places like mines where cave-ins, gas fumes, explosions were common, cotton mills in which the temperature were dangerously high, and factories where they were terribly mistreated. Children were forced to work long hours, earning low wages, received few, if any, breaks, and were disciplined by receiving beatings. For example, Joseph Hebergam, a boy who worked since age 7, stated, “…and beat us till we were black and blue,” resulting in Hebergam being forced to deal with life long

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