Immmunization Essay

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Immunization is the process of making an individual resistant to an infectious disease by the administration of a vaccine. It is regarded as one of the most significant achievement in public health because of its role in the prevention of over two million deaths annually and the control of communicable diseases like measles and polio (World Health Organisation, 2016). However, most people continue to avoid this form of primary prevention due to concerns over vaccine safety. In 1998, Andrew Wakefield published a study claiming that the measles, mumps, rubella vaccine (MMR) was linked to autism. Even though this study was retracted and Wakefield was struck off for misconduct, most people still refused to immunize (Begley, 2009). Given that …show more content…
The purpose of this study was to determine why parents choose to deviate from the immunization schedule. This research was a descriptive study using a survey with open-ended questions (Whyte et al, 2011). Study sample consisted of 143 parents who had chosen to alter their children’s immunization schedule. The results revealed that 96.2% were worried about autism, 95.4% stated that vaccines were not tested enough, and 76.8% were concerned about adverse events like anaphylaxis and febrile seizures. Again, the conclusion indicates that parental misconceptions on vaccine safety influenced immunization (Whyte et al, 2011). The strength of this study is its use of open-ended questions and a limitation is that it only involved those who chose not to adhere to their immunization schedule, and not parents who did not …show more content…
Uno, Uchiyama, Kurosawa, Aleksi and Ozaki (2012) conducted a case-controlled study to determine if the MMR vaccine, or a combination of other vaccines were associated with autism. The study sample included cases (n=189) diagnosed with autism and controls (n=234). After calculating odd ratios, results indicated that there was no significant difference between cases and controls regarding MMR immunizations and autism as the odd ratio was 1.04 (normal range was 0.65-1.68). This was also the case for other vaccines and autism as odd ratio was 1.10 (range was 0.95-1.26). Therefore, they concluded that there was no reason to avoid immunizations because there was no statistically significant relationship between autism and vaccines (Uno et al, 2012). The strength of this study is that the researchers studied other vaccines and not just the MMR vaccine, however, the study sample was genetically homogenous (only Japanese

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