Immanuel Kant's Theory Of Ethics

Superior Essays
Austin Parker
Intro to Ethics, Dr. Rigoni
5/4/2015

Introduction
Ethics plays a huge role in the interaction of human beings on a daily basis. It allows people to choose between right and wrong behaviors in order to create a morally upright society. For this reason, several ethical theories exist to help understand the relationship between people. A majority of well-known philosophers such as Immanuel Kant, Bentham, Stuart Mill, and Gauthier have made great contributions to sociology by theories such as deontology, utilitarianism, and social contact theories. However, the deontological work by Immanuel Kant is the most favored compared to other moral frameworks. Its focus on duties of individuals rather than consequences has my preference.
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This is why he centered his theory of deontology on the human’s ability to reason. On the contrary, Kant’s deontology doesn’t account for one’s emotions, feelings, and consequences when deciphering the moral law or duty. The theory focuses on the understood law that human beings should perform the right actions from thinking rationally. Deontological ethics sets appropriate guidelines to raise reasoning and encourage positive behavior. Kant’s deontology relies on the human will to classify the validity of their actions (Waluchow, 2003). Good human will is connected with positive actions in social settings and moral law. However, some factors will result in weak and irrational decisions that affect the efficiency of the decision making …show more content…
It applies to tall people and satisfies the standard human rights adopted globally. The world 's human rights are based on the proposed laws of deontological ethics (Mizzoni, 2010). Several philosophers have developed ethical theories, but few of them conform to human rights (Hinman, 2013). The majority violate the rights of an individual. Like the social contract theory, it characterized society based on class, culture, and race which does not conform to equality.
Reliability
Kant’s deontology is more reliable than that of other theories. It has the necessary guidelines with the primary goal of instilling a culture of moral obligation. The structure is effective since it creates an ongoing habit of good morals. Human reasoning over emotions and social situations curbs the urge to use bad behaviors. While the focus of utilitarianism on the consequences is not reliable compared to deontology. It allows people to disobey rules based on consequences, failing to embed moral virtues into our actions.
Evidence
Deontology has been big in the past compared to other ethical theories. For example, it defends human rights by forbidding infringement of the right to fair treatment. The utilitarianism view fails to respect the rights of individuals. It 's draw to consequences of actions makes it hard to keep the welfare, and interests of

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