Imagery In Two Kinds By Amy Tan

1401 Words 6 Pages
The Imagery in Two Kinds Amy Tan's “Two Kinds” shows readers the problematic relationship between mothers and daughters. The mother-daughter relationship is the main conflict through the story. Conflicts occur owing to divergent opinions about identification. As a Chinese immigrant living in California, Jing-Mei's mother decides to put her idea of the American Dream in the mind of her daughter. But being born in America, Jing-Mei hates the idea of her mother’s American Dream being put on her. Two Kinds examines their relationship problems, and is shown through her mother’s expectations, cultural views, and feminist views. "Only two kinds of daughters those who are obedient and those who follow their own mind! Only one kind of daughter …show more content…
As a second generation Chinese daughter, Jing-Mei had ever thought that she can be a prodigy because of her mother's encouragement. However, after she blew her piano competition, her self-identification changes. She does not think that she can be a prodigy anymore and she only wants to be herself. The piano contest brings her two kinds of feelings: The raised hope and failed expectations. As for external struggles, it refers to her response to her mother. She is trapped in whether she should obey her mother. Arguments are also a kind of way of communication. In the process of arguing with her mother, she reflects on herself. She obeys her mother out of respect. Nonetheless, while she finds that her mother paves the wrong way for her, she starts to rebel her mother. While she talks back to her mother, she feels scared and good meanwhile. Her mood is complicated which includes two kinds of …show more content…
Unlike traditional Chinese men, he is not dominant. In Two Kinds, he appears only when the piano competition takes place. The main characters are the mother and the daughter. The writer may want to put emphasis on females and this writing approach can be seen as positive discrimination. Moreover, Two Kinds looks into the influence of oppression in China in 1949 through the Chinese mothers’ character. According to Cathrine Romagnolo’s article on the feminist views of the story, as parents of Jing-Mei, the mother and the father play totally different roles. Jing-Mei's mother is aggressive and is a model of traditional Chinese mothers who are strict with their children. She thinks that she has power over domestic sphere so she controls her daughter. The writer wants to create space for parents to reflect on whether they had ever done these things on their children. The role that parents should play is to guide, not to

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