United States Immigration System Analysis

1198 Words 5 Pages
America is in need of a reform of the immigration system. As of 2013, there were about 41.3 million immigrants living in the United States, which broke the record. That is about 13% of the entire US population. Just in 2013, 990,553 people were granted lawful permanent residence, or LPR, in the United States. In 2012, it was reported that 11.4 million illegal immigrants were living in the US. As much as I’d love to see people live in the land of the free, America cannot jeopardize their own citizens’ jobs, education, and public assistance to cater to non-US citizens. Many times foreign born students can even get breaks on their tuition just because they are foreign. Why do American born citizens not get a special tuition break for growing …show more content…
The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, or CBO, estimated that our GDP would increase by 3.3% in 2023 and 5.4% by 2033 if we implement the immigration reform. GDP increases Americans standard of living. In 2011, immigrants created 28% of all new businesses. A total of 4.7 million people were employed by immigrant-owned businesses in 2007, which generated more than $776 billion in income. All of this also increased our nation’s GDP. The National Survey of College Graduates showed that about 29% of scientists are immigrants, which proves that immigrants develop a lot of new technology. The only issue I have with this is that these immigrants took available scientist positions from the American people. Many American college students who studied science may not have been able to find a job in their field because of all of the immigrants who took …show more content…
We now have about 12 million illegal aliens in the United States. This proves that when we allow illegal immigrants to become legal just to “get rid of the problem”, it causes an even worse problem. In 2011, FAIR reported that $113 billion per year goes to welfare for illegal

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