Illegal Immigration History

1487 Words 6 Pages
The true origins of illegal immigration have been linked to the early 1900’s and the end of the bracero program in 1964. In the early 1900’s, the United States did not consider illegal immigration to be an issue. As a matter of fact, up until 1914, points of entry were left largely unprotected and members of society were able to freely come and go. The beginning of security implementation came with the Immigration Act of 1924. From this point on, anybody entering the country without permission was considered to be an illegal immigrant. As the years passed, an influx of people were making their way into the country and a shortage of labor in world war two led the United States to enact the bracero program. The bracero program invited millions …show more content…
The task force consisted of 450 members assigned with guarding a small portion of the 1,933-mile Mexican border. In 1980, the border work force was expanded from 450 workers to 2,200 members and spending towards border control was increased. When the 9/11 attacks took place there was much concern for the security of our nation. The ability for the Al-Qaeda terrorists to easily enter the country sparked fear within the hearts of many, leading to the revolution of security. Today, 21,000 members guard the entry of individuals into our nation. Around 18,300 of these members guard the Mexican Border while close to 2,200 hold down the Canadian side. The remaining border patrol agents, about five hundred, guard points of entry into the United States. Budget spending for border security has skyrocketed and valuable technology has been implemented. As of 2012 the southern border alone was comprised of: 208 checkpoints; 12 bases for critical monitoring; 337 digital surveillance components; 13,406 ground sensors; 254 short, medium, and long range surveillance systems; 15 watch towers; and 10 drones (Reed). Since the 1980’s billions have been spent on border security. While illegally coming into the United States used to be an easy task, it has now become an extreme endeavor. Before there was extensive fencing, border patrol, and technology; Illegal immigrants simply had to find a spot that lacked supervision and cross into the …show more content…
This model splits the job market into two separate sectors, the primary segment and the secondary segment. The primary region contains skilled workers with valuable experience, such as engineers. This category beholds prime working conditions, adequate pay, solid structure, and job security. In contrast with the primary segment, the secondary sector is composed of unskilled workers and people who did not receive a high school education. The secondary region ensues difficult job conditions, insufficient pay, unstable job security, and little to no opportunity for advancement (Nadadur). Research shows that illegal immigrants set value upon the economy by furthering its progression, while imposing minimal competition on native workers. When analyzing the facts of rivalry between illegal immigrants and unskilled American workers, there is a sufficient amount of misconception. In figure 2 one can see that the occupations of farming, fishing, and forestry hold a native unemployment rate of twelve percent. At the same time, illegal workers make up thirty percent of the labor force in those regions. One could argue that illegal workers take the twelve percent of jobs, however; it’s more common that the other 70% of the labor force are assuming the tasks. Illegal workers mostly undertake unwanted jobs in the secondary sector and usually contend against themselves. Economic

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