Ideology Of Child Poverty

2486 Words 10 Pages
Social policy is based on the different ideologies of wellbeing and is a realistic way of thinking about social issues and problems in our society today. Ideologies are concepts and opinions on certain matters. It is a framework and the process of our thoughts. The way we think and act is set around ideology about what is logical and the way things must be. It is an umbrella of various concepts that categorizes theoretical positions based on their perspective and view of the world (Beddoe & Maidment, 2009). It is also about realistic responses. Social policy is influenced by sets of beliefs about human society, “human nature” and the human condition. Every economic and social policy is based on theory, as stated by Belgrave et al. (2008). …show more content…
Studies show that children who are living in poverty tend to suffer more disadvantages (Children’s Commissioner, 2014). This also means that child poverty is way more than about the lack of food and there are many factors that causes child poverty. These child poverty indicators and factors are things such as income poverty, living conditions or housing, material hardships, education, and poor physical and mental health. (Child Poverty Monitor, 2015). O’Brien, in Beddoe & Maidment (2009), suggests that there are six possible main causes of child poverty, which include the lack of advocacy and knowledge, decreasing support for egalitarianism, costs, dominance of market liberal values and the democratic process where children do not have a voice and a vote. This is why we need to think about policy initiatives that will address this social issue in order to tackle and reduce child poverty here in Aotearoa New …show more content…
This will help children that are often missing out and do not have the opportunity to experience normal childhood activities such as sports, outings and playing. These impacts may not seem so big, children who experience this are more likely to have lower health outcomes, weaker social support and networks, and lower educational achievement, which can result in criminal offending, lower income and reduced possibility of employment (Children’s Commissioner’s Expert Advisory Group on Solutions to Child Poverty, 2012). Although economic, educational and physical health support is very beneficial, we also need to take care of the mental and emotional health of children in poverty. Children who are living in poverty have higher susceptibility of mental illnesses than children who are not. They are often left out, not accepted by peers, have lower self esteem and feel shame (Children’s Commissioner’s Expert Advisory Group on Solutions to Child Poverty,

Related Documents