Ideology In Brave New World

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The book “Brave new world” written by Aldous Huxley and the “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses” written by the French Marxist philosopher Louis Althusser. Are two ideologies that give philosophical concepts concerning the government in the society. Brave new world antedates improvement in the current use of human technology in reproduction, psychosomatic influence and classical acclimatization to bring a change in society. Althusser's Marxism focuses on false conscious ideas in the achievement of societal unity. There is a significant influence of the ruling class on the legislative procedures of the government where both ideologies have common ground as well as differences. Huxley explains how an all-powerful government gets control …show more content…
Conversely, the primary role of the repressive state contraptions such as, courts, police department and the armed forces engage into timely interventions that favor the ruling class. Also, the ruling class controls the state apparatus since they control the authority of the state that is, radical, legislative and the courts. According to Huxley's “Brave new world,” there is no subjugation of any form. The government engages into policies that promote equal contribution to achieve societal stability. Additionally, there is a great difference in the approach used by the government to apportion individuals to match their abilities. In the “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses,” Althusser shows preference to remain in the contemporary world where the government has a culture full of laws, beliefs, and politics instead of moving to a knowledgeable place to venture into scientific research (Althusser). This argument is enough proof that Althusser is massively connecting the idea since the new government is encouraging such efforts. According to Huxley, the government substantially supports the return of the established experts to the island that is a more human …show more content…
Long ago before Huxley's “Brave new world,” Althusser brings a thought about the world where every individual is capable of serving the community was a common belief in every person. Besides, every person needs to advance on their abilities as a profession to benefit all people. Like Huxley's Brave new world, the government puts effort to enable the creation of a society where specific human abilities are developed such that every person is capable of contributing towards benefiting the society as a whole. Additionally, it can be implied that specialized capabilities are advanced that fits their demands in the society to improve the stability and control of the community. The ruling people are known as the Alpha, intermediate class is Beta, and the poor are Deltas. Every individual in the society takes part in what they can do to accomplish the state of social stability. An individual need is less critical as compared to the societal need since every person has a purpose and objectives to work for (Huxley). The action of serving the need of others and everybody ensures that your need is also satisfied. In the concept, a further argument in favor of this assumption is that a human can be easily replaced, unlike the society's efficacy. The societal stability is when the needs of every person are controlled. In “Brave new world” the government takes the initiative to match individuals

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