Identity In Richard Wright's Black Boy

Superior Essays
Before analyzing the problem of identity in the Black American literature like Back Boy, we must have a more precise notion of the term identity. The term identity seems not only to have pervaded the literature on the Negro revolution in the U.S.A., but also to have come to represent in India (and in other countries) something in the revolutionary psychological field of the colored races and nations who seek (try to find) inner as well as outer emancipation from colonial rule and colonial power. Social scientists sometimes attempt to make it more concrete, using such terms as "identity crisis," "self-identity" or "sexual identity." For the sake of logical or experimental maneuverability, they try to treat these terms as matters of social roles, …show more content…
Its main purpose is to attack and refute the white South’s view of him as a ‘‘boy,’’ as an inferior version of whites. Sometimes loudly, sometimes quietly, Wright instructs his readers that they do not see him, but rather a belief about him. He is resolutely insisting, through the structure and themes of Black Boy, that he be granted the same dignity and autonomy his readers want for themselves. He is also looking for the understanding and sympathy that he felt lacking from his family, community, and the white South (Felgar, Robert,1998).
In chapter one of a “Black Boy”, awareness comes to young Wright at the age of four. This awareness for a black child carries with it mixed and contradictory emotions: love, fear, guilt, distrust, longing and feeling of hopelessness, all within the early stage of growing up. So, Wright opens his eyes as a child and find his psyche’ entrenched with an image reflecting the social and racial realities of his
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He concluded "that those powerful, invisible white faces ruled the lives of black people to a degree that hut few black people could allow themselves to acknowledge." This idea has a curious effect on Wright's characters such as Fishbelly, Bigger or "Black Boy." They hate the whites so much and they are so ashamed of being black that they feel in crisis, a crisis of alienation from their own group and from the world of the whites from which they had been excluded. Fish was aware "how black people looked to white people; he was beginning to look at his people through alien eyes and what he saw evoked in him a sense of distance between him and his people that baffled and worried him (Wright, Long Dream, p. 326.)
In Black boy, an auto biography by Richard Wright, we see the struggles of being black in a world dominated by white people. Black boy is a story about how a young black man fights the societal norms that are continuously pushed upon him. He does this by questioning the position that the white dominated society has given him. He asks questions about the status quo in his country that his black peers are afraid to ask .Richard is a boy who wants to change his life for the better but his environment is not conducive to gifted young boys like

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