Identity Crisis In Alice Cooper's Clones

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Reproductive cloning of humans would lead to an identity crisis in cloned individuals. Alice Cooper’s song, “Clones (We’re All),” portrays the feelings of a person who realizes he is a clone and wishes he was a unique individual. The lyrics, “I’m all alone, so are we all. We’re all clones” show the anguish that the narrator suffers from as a clone (Alice). He portrays a world in which everyone is a clone of each other. No one is unique, and that causes an existential crisis in the narrator. He feels all alone because everyone he talks to is identical to him. He would find life more interesting if there were different people to interact with. The lyrics, “We don’t need your kind, the other ones, ugly ones, stupid boys, wrong ones” show the viewpoint …show more content…
When she says, “Our beings used interchangeably,” she wonders if no one would be able to tell the difference between she and her clone (4). If she and her clone could be used correspondently, then she would not be a unique individual, which causes her grief. She struggles with her individuality throughout the rest of the poem. She says, “Would I never think on my own?” because if there is someone just like her, then her clone may have the same thoughts as her (6). This is an interesting concern, but I do not think that even if two people have the exact same genes that they would have the same thoughts. It seems too far in the realm of science fiction for that to be real. Marshall goes on to say, “If we all had clones would we find / There could never be one of a kind?” to reiterate her feelings that she is no longer an individual (9-10). This is similar to Alice Cooper’s song in which the narrator feels that a world filled with clones is a world that has no individuality or uniqueness. Marshall also brings up the issue of interfering with God when she says, “Would this confound and upset God?” (14). Religious opponents to cloning would find it blasphemous since it involves creating life. There is also the religious notion that God created all people to be unique, so it would also go against God to try and …show more content…
Blade Runner, directed by Ridley Scott, is a film about a dystopian future where clones (known as replicants) exist as slaves designed to work on other planets. The replicants escape to Earth, and Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) is hired to kill them. One of the central questions of the film is whether clones can have feelings just like other humans. Replicant Hunters ask questions to possible replicants to decide if they really are human or not, based on their emotional response to the questions. Rick tests Rachel (Sean Young) and figures out that she is a replicant, but she does not believe him. Replicants have memories and emotions just like humans, which makes it incredibly hard to tell the difference between them. Rick tells Rachel about a memory she had during the summer, and Rachel agrees with it and expands on the memory. Rick then says to her, “Those aren’t your memories. They’re somebody else’s” (Blade Runner). The doctor who created her implanted the memory into her to make her more human, which is an idea that Rachel struggles with. It is scary to think that our memories could be false and that even though we believe we are humans, we really are not. The clone’s struggle with identity is the central argument for why reproductive cloning should never be used on humans. Not only is a clone confused about its identity, in Blade Runner it is used for slavery. Advocates of

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