Identity And Nature In The Invisible Man, By Ralph Ellison

1387 Words 6 Pages
Ralph Ellison promotes the actions of the tyrannical society through the use of violent or insulting events— the battle royal, the kicking out of the college for Negroes, the assault at Liberty Paints, Rallies during the Dark Brotherhood era, and the riots in Harlem— Ellison creates a dark atmosphere for the white community in the novel. This follows with the Invisible Man 's discovering himself in Identity and nature as he views his role in society versus the roles of the whites, focusing on the Invisible Man to understand and choose his path in the society rather than being another face in the crowd. The atmosphere of the white society is tossed around as a dark minical society as the reader lives through the life of the narrator and his …show more content…
During this chapter the narrator discovers his resent for his past and finally forgives it. The narrator finds a yam vendor and reminisces about his childhood. The narrator finds himself put in a place of regret, because the current society, he lives in a society that molded him and his character, trying to make the Invisible Man place himself above the rest of the blacks, in order to receive respect from the white, but while doing so he resented his entire past and all his carrying cultures. It made him realize, by following a role place by the white men, he was invisible. “I had accepted the accepted attitudes and it had made life seem simple…” (267) It was at this point he realize his invisibility was caused by the white society, he acknowledges his resent yet he does not change his ways rapidly. It was not until a few moments later when he witnesses an eviction, his truly understands the cruelty of the white society against everyone else; not just blacks. “I looked at the old people, feeling my eyes burn, my throat tightens. The old woman sobbing was having a strange effect upon me— as when a child, seeing the tears of its parents, is moved by both tears and sympathy to cry.” (269) The narrator then proceeded to recognize his wrong choice of …show more content…
He had been working for the Brotherhood only to show that he made a wrong choice by declaring himself to the a communist party. They show the narrator there is no sympathy in this world by giving little to no emotion to Clifton’s Death. Instead, they, personally Brother Jack, declare it as a ‘dramatized shooting’ that involved a traitor. In response to the outburst of a past brother’s death, the narrator responds “He was a man and a Negro; a man and a brother; a man and a traitor as you say; then he was a dead man, and alive or dead he was jam-full of contradictions. So full that he attracted half of Harlem to come out and stand in the sun in answer to our call. So what is a traitor?” (467) Not only was the Invisible man talking about and defending Clifton in this case, but he was talking about himself, he feels like he is a traitor in this society making him feel alone. Understanding through that his entire story leads to him not being invisible in this society, but being invisible from the society. He never conformed to a group and it leaves him alone to walk in a path that leaves him indifferent from others. “The invisible man leaves us with a final question which serves as a warning: ‘Who knows but that, on the lower frequencies, I speak for you’ ” (Randall) Randall explains it was the invisible man’s choice was to follow through his own destiny thus remaining invisible to the

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