Icc's Intervention in Northern Uganda Essay

10412 Words Feb 19th, 2015 42 Pages
The ICC’s Intervention in Northern Uganda: Beyond the Simplicity of Peace vs. Justice

Paper by David Lanz

The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy May 2007

The ICC in Northern Uganda

David Lanz

Introduction The creation of the International Criminal Court (ICC) via the entry into force of the Rome Statute on July 1st 2002 sparked enthusiasm. For M. Cherif Bassiouni, “The ICC combines humanistic values and policy considerations essential for the attainment of the goals of justice, redress and prevention as well as the need for the restoration of world order and world peace.”1 Ironically, five years after its creation, the Court has been accused of being an impediment to what it was created to promote: peace. With regards to
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Cherif Bassiouni, “The Universal Model: The International Criminal Court” in M. Cherif Bassiouni, ed., PostConflict Justice (Ardsley, NY: Transnational Publishers, 2002), 813-825, at 819. (Emphasis added) One of the most eminent experts of international criminal justice, M. Cherif Bassiouni was the Chairman of the Drafting Committee of the 1998 Diplomatic Conference on the Establishment of an International Criminal Court. He was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for his contribution to the creation of the ICC in 1999. 2 M. Cherif Bassiouni, “The ICC – Quo Vadis?” Journal of International Criminal Justice 4 (2006), 421-427, at 424. 3 Quoted in Frederick Nzwili, “The Forgotten War,” Catholic World News, April 2004, Available at [Accessed 23 April 2007].

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The ICC in Northern Uganda

David Lanz

benefits of the ICC’s intervention in terms of bringing about peace in Northern Uganda. The analysis takes into account the particularities of the Ugandan context and evaluates the ICC’s intervention in the context of broader strategies of conflict resolution. While the pressure generated by the ICC indictments was instrumental to bringing the LRA to the negotiating table in the first place, they now potentially constitute a major stumbling block to the successful conclusion of peace negotiations, especially considering that LRA cadres are primarily motivated by their own survival and safety. As a peace incentive, the ICC should consider removing the threat posed

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