Counter Terrorism Case Study

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Introduction: The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is a non-state terror organization operating out of the Middle East. ISIS addresses the political and economic grievances of Sunni Muslims and utilizes asymmetric statecraft and exploits globalization to reach their goals wealth, capacity and influence. They strategically execute domestic and transnational terror attacks in an attempt to expose the weakness of the established state to incite political reform. Non state actors such as ISIS emerge and thrive within the dimensions of, ‘seams’, anonymity and mobility. Each of these grants a capacity to carry out their terror attacks and utilize asymmetric statecraft while remaining seemingly inviolable to the attacks of established states. …show more content…
Their use of statecraft is entirely contingent on their ability to exist within a seam, maintain anonymity and remain mobile. For the state to defeat ISIS they must strategically identify their use of the vulnerable dimensions and collaboratively work to close them. This works to exhaust the options of ISIS to employ strategy while increasing the effectiveness of counter-terror operations (bremmer 259). States do this by utilizing statecraft beyond the traditional application to adjust to the asymmetry of power. Counter Terrorism is state action used to “ inhibit terrorist attacks or curtail their consequences” (Sandler 78). The success of these operations relies on a cohesive exertion of power by the international community. Unilateral responses to terror often work against global welfare and strengthen the non state actor (Sandler 76). Unified mutual deterrence of terror stands to be the most effective way to eliminate ISIS (SU 31). Traditionally states are hesitant to work together towards an issue that does not directly affect their population. Due to ISIS larger circle of targets, it is expected that more states would be willing to engage in the prisoner 's dilemma and eliminate ISIS (Bremmer …show more content…
The international system will use its skills of statecraft to close seams. Anonymity will be reduced through targeting leaders. And mobility will be limited through the collective action of the international community. ISIS may also fail through the growth of the organization towards statehood. Even when ISIS fails,terror groups will continue to arise in the 21st century. More seams will emerge, and the disenfranchised will use means of violence to propagate political change. In the end, states have the capacity, intelligence and the support lines to adapt and eliminate threats in the

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