Ramadi Case Study

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On May 17th, 2015, the Islamic State seized the Iraqi city of Ramadi. The loss of city and regional control will be a major setback to the United States’ effort to stop the spread of ISIS. With control over Ramadi, which is approximately 110 kilometers from Baghdad, ISIS is poised to continue its spread into the Iraqi heartland. In the eyes of the American public, responsibility will almost solely fall upon the President and his administration for failing to keep the city out of the control of ISIS (Voeten & Brewer, 2006, p. 811). However, the loss of Ramadi will not make a major impact on the President’s approval. The President’s approval will drop while the U.S.is involved in the conflict against ISIS (Eichenberg et al., 2006, p. 797). …show more content…
President Obama remarked that certain “equipment [is] made for the battlefield [and] is not appropriate for local police departments. The President’s actions will likely divide an already divide an already split American public as the issues of police brutality and accountability remain divisive topics. Although it is not solely a partisan issue, Obama and many Democrats have created a precedent for the issue to become a deeply partisan debate. The President will likely both gain and lose approval, due the partisan division (Kriner & Schwartz, 2009, p. 630). The issue of police reform is a salient issue in the U.S. political zeitgeist. Issues that have a staying power in the public’s mind will have a deeper and more profound effect on the president’s approval (Edwards et al., 1995, p. 109-110). By continuing his support of a partisan issue the President will continue to lose public approval from partisan Republicans citizens (Haider-Markel & Carr, 2007, p. …show more content…
Obama expressed his belief that his plan will not allow Iran to use their nuclear technology to develop a weaponized nuclear device. Many Israelis and Americans, both Jewish and not, fear a nuclear-capable Iran will inevitably endanger both countries. The uneasy situation of nuclear dealings with a traditionally hostile Iran has likely upset much of the American public. In his speech, Obama discussed an issue of foreign policy; Presidential speeches that focus on the topic of foreign policy tend to lower presidential approval (Simmon et al., 1989, p. 76). With the general unpopularity of the agreement by many Americans, the President jeopardized his public opinion because of his strong stance (Haider-Markel & Carr, 2007, p. 457-459). However, the President’s continuous rhetoric and pitching of his nuclear deal proposal with Iran seem to reflect a priming of the American public to make the issue more salient in the mind of Americans (Druckman & Holmes, 2004, p.

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