I Want To Grow Up Not Be Smart Summary

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Reference: Nelson, A., & Hay, P. J. (2010). 'I don't want to grow up and not be smart': Urban Indigenous young people's perceptions of school. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, 39(1), 54-64.

The journal article that was written by Nelson and Hay explicitly reviews the results found from interviewing fourteen Indigenous students. These fourteen young Indigenous people showed that they have a strong will to succeed in school even though, they are still struggling not to conform the racial stereotypes that they have to face on a daily basis. The findings, in particular, point out that a welcoming and accepting school environment is the key to keeping Indigenous students interested in learning. During the interviews, several students mentioned that teachers who actually engage with them would make them want to come back to the classrooms.
Schools should be mindful of the cultural and social barriers that Indigenous students might encounter, and value those differences in the best way possible.

The article gives me a rich insight into the learning perspectives of Indigenous students. The conversations with Indigenous students showed that they do have desire for education and are keen on learning, which breaks the stereotypes. The problem is that the
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This kind of an identity crisis was also mentioned in the lectures by the guest speakers and in the tutorials. I think it is not just a challenge for Indigenous young people, it is also a challenge for school. How teachers treat Indigenous students in school can often decide how their peers would treat them. If we affirm their Indigenous identity and encourage them to embrace their true self, Indigenous students will experience so much less society pressure coming from their

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