Explain How Wordsworth Change People's Thinking And Revolutionize The Development Of Romanticism

1347 Words 6 Pages
The way that William Wordsworth wrote changed people 's thinking and revolutionized the romanticism of literature. William Wordsworth began writing poetry at a very young age. At the age of 16 Wordsworth composed a poem entitled The Pog: An Idyllium. (Wu, 1). When his mother died, he was sent to a grammar school which helped improve his poetry skills. His enthusiasm for the French Revolution took him to France again in 1791, where he had an affair with Annette Vallon, who bore him an illegitimate daughter, Caroline, in 1792 (Everett, 1). Having run out of money, Wordsworth returned to England the following year, and the Anglo-French war, following the Reign of Terror, prevented his return for nine years. In 1794 he was reunited with his sister …show more content…
There is much power in this poem in the use of the simile, a comparison between two unlike things using the word as. In this poem Wordsworth immediately immerses himself into Nature with the first line that employs a simile: "I wandered lonely as a cloud/That floats on high o 'er vales and hills." Further, the following stanza begins with another simile: "Continuous as the stars that shine/And twinkle on the milky way." The daffodils are personified as they are referred to as "a crowd,/A host." In similar fashion, the stars "toss their heads in sprightly dance." Then, "the waves beside them danced" also. The poet finds himself in "such a jocund company" and the "sparkling waves are in glee" (jocund and glee are emotional states). Repetition is used in the stanza "I gazed and gazed..." /g/; "What wealth" /w/. "That inward eye" is a metaphor for the memory (this is an implied comparison since memory is not mentioned).Paralellism is used in, "Beside the lake, beneath the trees" (the two phrases are constructed similarly)Repetition is also used in, "I gazed--and gazed" Also, many of the ideas of the first stanza are repeated …show more content…
Wordsworth communicates precisely by stressing the incommunicable nature of what he wishes to be present (O’Neill, 3). Wordsworth communicates precisely by stressing the incommunicable nature of what he wishes to be present (O’Neill, 3). A loving perception of a profound vent opens them- and us who read- to the intensity of full experience rather than the “half experience” Wordsworth decries. In order to develop the sensibility in his readers Wordsworth seems to go on to an uncompromising extreme of naivete-risking, even courting, the ridicule bred by the disdain sophistication can provoke- so that he may expose the essence underneath the ridicule. Heims writes that, “What may cause difficulty for readers is that Wordsworth is uncompromising” (Heims, 1). The purpose of poetry, Wordsworth is arguing, is to cultivate human sympathy by exciting the human mind (Heims, 1). Repeatedly Wordsworth attempts to show that simplicity and profoundity do not exclude each other. Wordsworth is trying to reeducate his readers as readers and people (Heims,

Related Documents