I The Divine By Rabah Alameddine

770 Words 4 Pages
The novel, I the Divine, by Rabih Alameddine, is about a woman by the name of Sarah Nour El-Din. Rabih wrote this novel in a series of first chapters toward the accomplishment of establishing a sense of never passing the first phases in Sarah’s life. Sarah was named by her grandfather after the actress Sarah Bernhardt. She is the daughter of a Lebanese doctor and an American woman. Their marriage was going wonderful until Sarah’s birth. Her birth was the main factor for their unsuccessful marriage and divorce. Her father, Mustapha, wanted a boy to hold his name and represent him, which Janet, the mother, couldn’t realize. He ended up remarrying a traditional Lebanese woman to fulfill his needs. By being subjected to two different cultures, …show more content…
They should be forgiven because they are liable to make mistakes. The author reinforces that no matter what difficulties someone could go through, family will always be there to support. In her childhood, Sarah was a rebellious kid. She started disobeying her religion and culture by playing soccer, wearing inappropriate clothes, planning, and making hilarious pranks on her stepmother. As she said, “One night, I went into the linen closet, took out the bags, and placed them in the cats’ litter box. The next night, I put them back between the sheets in the closet” (Alameddine, 35). She was a tomboy and in her father’s eyes a disappointment for the family. She stated, “He began to see me as a lot of cause, an embarrassment to the family.” (35) Later on, as she grew up, she ignored everybody, especially her stepmother. She was different than her sisters by failing at learning how to cook and embroider. All of that contributed to her unsuccessful adolescence and adulthood. As a result of not learning and following the principles of her culture and religion, she had a very tragic …show more content…
However, her family overseas gave her the right support. She knew that no matter what actions she decides on taking, her family would guide her and will respect her decisions. Another character in the novel that deviated from following the Lebanese culture and the family’s religion is Sarah’s brother, Ramzi. He was the ultimate kid that Mustapha was waiting for so long. Despite all that affection from Mustapha and his family on having a boy, Ramzi was a calamity. He ignored the fact that he was responsible for taking his family’s legacy further through newer generations. Besides that, he left his family and traveled to the United States to live with his boyfriend. Although he left his parents and was homosexual, his family never denied him, but indeed, they accepted him the way he was. After Lamia’s psychotic tragedy, Ramzi was present to comfort his dad. For Mustapha, having Ramzi around, gave him a certain relief and made him stray away of the occurrence. As Sarah said, “When my father saw Ramzi, he cried like a baby, hugging his son, shaking uncontrollably, which only increased the flow of tears of the family” (129). This illustrates how forgivable his family

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