Hyrcanus II And Aristobulus Essay

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Hyrcanus II, Aristobulus II, and Antipater Hyrcanus gave up his priesthood after a major defeat from his brother, Aristobulus. Then, after receiving help from Antipater, an Idumean governor, and the Nabatean kingdom, Hyrcanus was successful in pursuing Aristobulus once again. Aristobulus took refuge in the temple area and fortified himself. Roman armies, under the leadership of Pompey, came on the scene, supported Hyrcanus, and defeated Aristobulus. Pompey forcibly entered the Holy of Holies in the temple, which created a great deal of hostility between Jews and Rome. Through the Roman insertion, the Jewish state came to an end and Rome took power over Palestine. Roman Period (63 BC-AD 70) Now that Palestine was under Roman rule, it …show more content…
The Hellenistic period began with the conquests of Alexander the Great. Alexander literally changed the world including that of the Jewish community. He set out to engage anyone and everyone in the Greek culture. Culture included government, architecture, entertainment, dress, language, priorities, values, religion, behavior, and much more. This set in course the infusion of Hellenistic culture into Judaism for about 360 years and it continues to have a tremendous influence even …show more content…
First of all, The Jews generally spoke Hebrew or Aramaic. The Hellenist spoke Greek. The Hebrews religion was monotheistic and sensible while the Hellenists were polytheistic and theoretical. The Hebrew religion worshiped Yahweh and the Hellenistic religion was pagan. The list of differences could go on and on. At first, the Jews had little contact with Greek and Hellenistic culture. As time went on and the Alexandrian conquest became more evident, Jews began to see more and more Hellenistic ways of life. Under Antiochus IV Epiphanes’ rule in the Seleucid period, there was a heavy initiative to comprehensively Hellenize Judea. Other leaders as noted in the first section also supported the Hellenistic thrust and many of the Jews became more and more indoctrinated. In each period, there was attraction and assimilation alternating with tension and hostility as Greek influence affected Jewish

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