Hyperkalemic Paralysis In Horses Case Study

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This paper will discuss the management practices that can be implicated to help control the severity of Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis in affected horses. Because of the debilitating effects that this condition has, it is important to examine the ways that this disorder can be controlled. Low potassium diets, regular turnout, and a constant schedule have been shown to effectively manage the condition of Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis. The role of potassium in action potentials, as well as in muscular contraction, is reviewed. Also investigated is the ideal way to feed a horse affected with this condition. In recent years, a new condition in the performance horse industry has surfaced which is affecting the athletic ability of these equines. …show more content…
Microbes in the cecum assist in the breakdown of remaining material, which then release any nutrients which might have persisted in the digested feedstuff (20, 21). Water-soluble nutrients get passively absorbed to a substantial degree in the cecum of the horse (20, 21). Along with the cecum, where a majority of water in the digestive tract gets absorbed, the large colon also absorbs remaining moisture (20, 21). A small degree of nutrient absorption, as well as microbial activity, takes place in the large colon (20, 21). It is in the small colon where any remaining water is resorbed, and feces is formed which will then be expelled through the rectum (20, …show more content…
For HYPP, the expression of the disorder varies from animal to animal with some affected horses remaining asymptomatic, while some are affected more severely (1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 21). As described before, homozygous dominant horses are affected to a greater extent, and may experience some respiratory problems associated with the condition even if they are not undergoing an episode (1, 16, 19). The classical clinical signs of this disorder include muscle weakness or paralysis, and are usually more evident when the horse is young and in training for competitions (1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 19, 21). Due to the characteristics of HYPP, it is understandable that this condition has been confused with other muscle disorders such as rhabdomyolysis (2, 13, 15). By knowing what the signs of HYPP are, the people who deal with these affected animals can better understand how this genetic defect affects the

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