The Influence Of Technology In Ancient Egypt

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During the end of the Twelfth Dynasty at the close of the Middle Kingdom, the Hyksos foreigners invaded the Nile River Valley and eventually gained control over the majority of the Egyptian Kingdom. While it is disputed whether the foreigners emerged from Asia or from areas of Palestine, this feat was achieved through superior technology surpassing that of the Egyptians. This caused the Second Intermediate Period, or the time before the New Kingdom and after the Middle during which the Hyksos occupied the Nile Valley, altering the culture by contributing to the arts and domestic appliances, introducing superior weaponry by means of bronze, and improving the Egyptian army as well as causing a trend of conquering, war-like pharaohs. It was because …show more content…
Bronze was the most potent metal of the time, with which stronger weapons and armor could be crafted. Previously, Egypt did not possess the adequate technology to defend properly against the growing presence of bronze in external warfare. While in the past, Egypt was defended with flint knives, axes identical to those for lumber cutting, and throwing sticks, with the arrival of bronze, the Egyptian army boasted spears, daggers, battle axes, and scimitars, each crafted with the new metal. Among the most important instrument of war where the war chariots. These were vehicles used in battle and were positioned on two wheels and drawn by two horses. The exterior was crafted from wood and furnished with leather, some would even be decorated with bronze. Standing in these chariots gave soldiers an advantage because of the speed, elevation, and psychological effect it held over foot soldiers. One of the weapons often used atop these chariots was the composite bow. This improvement upon the previous bow was stronger, and had a larger range. Because this bow was designed to curve forward while unstrung, it was subject to even more tension than the regular bow, allowing for more power and distance when the string pulled back was released, as it had to be pulled back farther. Through these advancements in weaponry, the Hyksos invasion contributed to the safety and …show more content…
These pharaohs would ultimately protect Egypt from outside invaders and lose dependency on Egypt’s natural boundaries to isolate the kingdom. In the absence of isolation, there was imminent pressure to improve defenses to avoid conquer. In an attempt to fulfill this, Egypt itself became a conqueror. One of the first conquering pharaohs was Thutmose I. As a result of his conquests, the land of Egypt was expanded to Syria, Nubia, and farther south to the Fourth Cataract drastically improving Egyptian influence, lessening its chances of being attacked. Under Thutmose I, Egypt became the first empire to command western Asia. Not only was Egypt expanding and gaining prosperity, but it was also able to attain peace with other countries who did not dare invade. With the open of the New Kingdom and the defeat of the Hyksos, however, came a new array of enemies, one of which was the Hittites. These people arrived from modern Turkey as well as northern Syria, and beginning in the first half of the fourteenth century BC, slowly infiltrated vassal states, even seizing the major port city of Byblos. By the fifth year of the reign of Rameses II, Egyptian control of Syria was compromised, and war had begun disputing the region. While this Pharaoh would eventually expel the

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