Hunger Games Comparative Analysis Essay

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Hunger Games Comparative Analysis In today’s society, we are forced to choose between blindly abiding by authority and exercising our freedoms to their fullest extent. But at what point do we choose to divulge from either path to do what is morally right? In Eric From’s article, “Disobedience as a Physiological Moral Problem”, he analyzes how the comforts of obedience and conformity can impact a person’s perspective of what is ethically just. Similarly, in “The Perils of Obedience”, by Stanley Milligram, the author recollects the results from his shocking experiment and the moral paths each subject decides to follow. Likewise, in the movie adaptation of the book “Hunger Games”, by Suzanne Collins, tributes from rich and impoverished areas …show more content…
One experiment conducted and analyzed in “The Perils of Obedience”, by Stanley Milligram, answers many of the similar moral questions asked in the Hunger Games as well as in Milligram’s current society as they discovered the horrific acts that took place during the Holocaust. While many today may view such acts as unthinkable, Milligram’s experiment puts into perspective how easy it is to fall victim to the commands of authority figures. When the subjects switched from the position of flipping the switches to being the ones who told the other subject to flip the shock inducing switch they each blamed the other for being the source “in a terrible destructive process”. Furthermore, when the instructor of the experiment said they would “take full responsibility” for the outcomes of the experiment many more adhered to what ever the instructor said and some even went to the full extent as to focus their efforts on caring for the instructor’s desires rather than the subjects quality of health. This suggests that people feel less at fault for their actions when they know the someone else is being held responsible, equivalently to the blame the tributes place on the system when they are “forced” to fight each other to the death with the comfort that obedience brought int he back of their

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