Summary: Unequal Distribution Of Wealth

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The current economic system within majority of the world is impeded through social and financial injustices. Many nations suffer with sufficient economic wealth to take care of its people and their basic needs. Unequal distribution of wealth negatively impacts many people with attaining financial security. Religion is one doctrine that inadvertently directs our economic attitudes. Humanity and the well being of the universe is a main objective that also aligns with economics. Authors Sallie McFague and Norman Solomon both critique the economic system through separate religions and their basic principles. McFague is concerned with Christianity and its impact on the global economy. Solomon uses Judaism and its underlying biblical perspectives …show more content…
Even if we force society to adhere to treating each other justly, helping the poor, improving education and providing food and shelter, it only improves social injustices. These practices don’t improve the economic injustices. According to McFague, we presently live in a neoclassical model that focuses on greed and individual wealth. Most Christians would agree that we are taught to live humanely and care about human well-being. We ought to share “scarce resources among all who need them,” yet we don’t abide by those morals (McFague 119). Humans display hypocrisy when wealth and basic necessities are involved. Our current system is the problem that leads to our inhumane attitudes and principles. One must not blame our behaviors because we adopted a view that we only knew and that has always seemed right. Instead, embracing a new model to change the unequal distribution of wealth is a solution offered by …show more content…
We need find ways to ensure that resources can last not only for our generation, but future generations, which will guarantee life for them in terms of food, water, and more. McFague disputes that the neoclassical model could provide this for humans because “we are addicted to our consumer lifestyle, and we are in denial that it is bad for us and for our planet (McFague 129). Many consume more than needed daily, and this consumption is taking away from people who are less fortunate. Adjusting the major flaws within our economy will manifest a new appreciation and understanding for sustainability and

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