Alienation In George Orwell's 1984

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George Orwell’s 1984 depicts a futuristic society in which government and technology evolve and create a oligarchical utopian society equipt with a figurehead, Big Brother. As the top tier of a strict class system, the Inner Party uses Big Brother’s persona to enforce mechanisms used to maintain power and influence. Any distinction of an individual most likely will lead to his/her condemnation and vaporization, in which the individual is erased from official documentation and ceases to exist. The Party believes that any distinction, either in action, facial expression, or thought not supported by government equates to criminal activity, or even harsher, treason. The author portrays Winston as perceptive and passionate, two qualities that …show more content…
Winston’s capability to love and lust separates him the rest of society. This quality is only strengthened when his love affair with Julia is discovered by the Thought Police. “And yet, in the sense in which he intended the word, he had not betrayed her. He had not stopped loving her” (Orwell 225). Winston’s love for Julia creates a connection to her that is more threatening to the Party than the actual offense that he and Julia committed. In a world in which facial expression can be considered treasonous (facecrime) and sex is shamed, Winston’s relationship with Julia represents a fear that the Party has: enthusiasm for anything other than the Party/Big Brother. The Party attempts to eradicate any emotion that is affiliated with love, relationships, sex, etc in order to draw society’s attention towards support for the government. Winston believes that he has not betrayed Julia, because even though he reveals all the details that could be used to out her, Winston does not let go of the love that he has for her. Emotional treason is the real reason why he is arrested by the Thought Police. In order to maintain power, the Party bans things like thoughtcrime, facecrime, and any sexual relations (with any intention other than to produce a child) in order to channel the passion that comes with emotion towards the blind support of the government. The difference …show more content…
In the interest of the ruling class and anyone under the Inner Party, both ideals were maintained in order for the current way of life to prevail. Winston is considered to be alienated from society based on his perceptiveness/awareness of the mannerisms of the Party and how to survive under it. He also believes that emotion such as love and lust carried meaning, whereas the rest of his community considers those concepts as treacherous. By showing the contrast between Winston and his peers, the author reveals how the society views nonconformity as shameful and a threat to social class-system in place. Conformity serves as a tool of power as well as a tool of survival for people living under the

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