Humanistic Idealism In William Shakespeare's Hamlet

1289 Words 5 Pages
Not only that Shakespeare is one of the most known writer of all time but he was also one of the greatest humanists encountered in the renaissance. Indeed, a lot of his texts were written in order to promote the greatness of human kind. As an example of this, Shakespeare expressed the image that he has on human nature in Hamlet, a great tragedy written during the renaissance englobing love and death. Indeed, the principal character, Hamlet, really defines well the position of humanists while saying: “What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty! In form and moving how express and admirable! In action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god! The beauty of the world. The paragon of animal.” A humanistic …show more content…
By looking carefully at the thoughts and behaviors of Iago, one clearly can see that he is the exact opposite. Indeed, the way that Iago thinks completely goes against what humanist thoughts, for example he doesn’t believe in love and beauty: as he says “I take this … scion” (Shakespeare 26). For him, love does ‘not exist and women are only attached to men for their sexual desires which destroys the humanistic version in which everything about love, beauty and purity is at the heart of someone’s …show more content…
In the play, even though Iago is under Othello, he doesn’t mind to lie to him and to use him to his own advantage. Indeed, Iago is angry with Othello who promoted another man, Cassio, to the position of lieutenant, overlooking Iago on the grounds that he was not experienced or qualified enough for the job. For this reason, Iago plans a revenge on Othello and, destroying him become his sole purpose. His feelings are particularly evident when he declares, “I hate the Moor. My cause is hearted; thine hath no less reason. Let us be conjunctive in our revenge against him. If thou canst cuckold him, thou dost thyself a pleasure, me a sport. There are many events in the womb of time, which will be delivered. (27). This state of mentality from Iago really shows that he is the kind of man that is driven by his appetite for power, something that he has no control over. Ideally, this appetite is controlled by reason but it seems like Iago have no way of determining what is good and what is evil, and therefore have no way to use reason to control his appetite. This appetite combined with the fact that he doesn’t respect his service toward Othello is only suggesting one thing, as seen in another Shakespearian play, Troilus and Cressida, Iago’s state of mentality is clearly referring to Ulyses’s Universal Wolf , saying that : if

Related Documents