Humanistic And Existentialism And Personality Psychology

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Introduction
Humanistic and existential theories, in the past and present, have always been an essential part of psychology. The two theories can often be mistaken for one another with how similar the they are with one another. The humanistic theory is founded on the matter that humans endlessly aim to be the best of their ability, while the existential theory is founded on individuals seeking to discover the purpose of life (Burger, 2014). Well-known theorists such as Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, and Viktor Frankl have all studied both theories, have determined the impact it has on personality psychology, and how an individual examines their own quality and their position. Ultimately, the purpose of this paper is to summarize the articles,
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First, two individuals are in psychological proximity. Second, the first individual which will be named the client, is in a condition of conflict. Specifically, the individual is vulnerable and anxious. Third, the second individual which will be named the therapist, is agreeable or unified in the relationship. Fourth, the therapist encounters unconditional positive regard for the client. Fifth, the therapist encounters an understanding of the clients internal being of reference and effort to connect the encounter to the client. Lastly, the connection between the therapist and client understanding and unconditional positive regard is to a slight degree achieved (Rogers, …show more content…
Although, there are many existentialisms as there are existentials. Each existentialist has their own version, but they have a nomenclature differently from others. For instance, such terms as existence and Dasein come from the writings of Jaspers and Heidegger (Frankl, 1967). However, the psychiatry authors have something in common. They use the same phrase, “being in the world” over and over again. The authors see the phrase as important accreditation of existentialism to frequently use the phrase. To understand the phrase, an individual must understand that being human means being committed and involved in a situation, and confronted with a whose indifference and reality is in no way drawn away from by the distinction of that “being” who is “in the world”. To the position of logotherapy, the authors agree it falls under existential psychiatry. Logotherapy has succeeded in being the only school to develop a technique. Breaking down the definition of logotherpay, it means healing through meaning. In logotherapy is called the will to meaning des occupy a certain place in the system. It refers to the case that man is striving to find a purpose in life (Frankl,

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