Humanism In The Italian Renaissance

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The Italian Renaissance in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italy was the upbringing of several new ideas and concepts that many Europeans were not familiar with at the time, as well as the transition from medieval to modern times. As stated by a Swiss historian in the nineteenth-century, the Renaissance was the “prototype of the modern world.” Humanism was introduced and spread by Francesco Petrarch, the “father of humanism,” as well as several other humanists. Platonism was briefly revived, and a new form of art called mannerism was popularized by Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and Michelangelo. Overall, the new styles of art, the rise to new secular and scientific values, the beginnings of the approach to reality, and the growth of city-states …show more content…
The Renaissance was a break with the Middle Ages because it introduced many new concepts and ideas. One was that of humanism, which is the importance of humans and their values and needs over those of religion. Another was questioning whether they should lessen the authority given to religious figures. These statements had never been spoken in the past, and at first they were thought of as obscene by much of the population. At the same time, the Renaissance owed its existence to medieval civilization because without it, the Renaissance would never have happened. People began to realize that the decisions made in medieval civilization were causing problems and not encouraging any development, so they brought forth their ideas and began creating art and literature different from anything they had ever seen …show more content…
The Italian Renaissance is one clear example. During the period of the High Renaissance (1450-1527), which was when art and sculpture met their peak in Italy, things were going on all over the place in Venice, Milan, the Papal States, Spain, France, and Rome. Not only did the French invade Italy, starting a vicious war, but Machiavelli wrote The Prince, which changed the Italian minds of literature forever. Overall, I disagree with this assumption because of the prosperity of the Renaissance artists Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and Michelangelo, even during the French

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