Environmental Impacts Of Human Population

1542 Words 7 Pages
The human population has multiplied more than 7 times since 1805, when the population first hit one billion people worldwide. Today the population has grown nearly to 7,400,000,000 (7 billion and 400 million) people globally. On October 12th, 1999 the six billionth person was born, Adnan Mevic in Sarajevo, Bosnia. Only twelve years later in 2011, the world hit a record of seven billion people. That’s roughly 150 babies born per minute worldwide-that makes the average birth rate 1.13% for 2015-2016. The human population is quickly climbing to a total of eight billion. On June, 13th in 2013, USA Today reported that the United Nations forecasts that the world’s population will reach 8.1 billion in 2025 and in 2050 the planet will have 9.6 billion …show more content…
With the fastest growth rate among all species on Earth, the human population has become one of the largest species in the world. Humans have had the greatest impact on the planet because there are so many people that are alive in the world. For decades, humans have taken over and changed the planet in various ways. Events such as the agriculture, scientific, industrial revolutions have impacted the planet significantly. Those events help not only the population grow but also start mass deforestation, pollution and global warming. In 1999, when the population hit 6 billion it was clear that scientists found that our population was causing climate changes from CO2 emissions. The temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere is increasing. Later on the emission of greenhouse-gas became known as global warming. The planet also faces other problems, like where were all of the people going to live, grow food and make supplies, this factor led to deforestation. Pollution from agriculture, industries and every day activities destroy the …show more content…
Zoos can conserve and set up breeding programs to help repopulate endangered animals. Breeding programs or captive breeding have been used successfully in zoos before. The goal of captive breeding is for endangered species to establish a captive population large enough to be stable and genetically healthy. There are species of animals that captive breeding has saved animals from extinction, for instance, Przewalski’s horses, California condors and Spix’s macaws. Animals that are a part of a global breeding program have been successfully saved such as the golden loin tamarin, the black-footed ferret and Guam rail. Zoos that participate in breeding program also educate the public on issues retaining endangered species. The information given helps raise support, funding and awareness. With more support from the public, zoos can help save endangered animals and countries can set up policies to protect endangered

Related Documents