Human Nature In Frankenstein

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Frankenstein- Human or Creature? Frequently, in books like Frankenstein, the goals of the writer are uncertain. It is clear in any case, that one of the numerous topics Mary Shelley presents is the mankind of Victor Frankenstein 's creation. Despite the fact that she displays proof that both doubt and obscure the creation 's humankind, it is apparent that this creature is by definition, a human. His humanity is depicted in his physical appearance, as well as in his mental and passionate considerations also. His humankind is questioned by the way that being human does not mean having particular DNA and having family to identify with, however he is defined by the many characteristics that make people unique in relation to different creatures …show more content…
During his stay at the De Lacey 's, Rick displays to the greatest extent, his enthusiasm to join human society. He learns that people can communicate with each other through sounds and immediately wants to learn (137). Once Rick finds his way to the De Lacey 's, his education grows. First he learns the ways and habits of humans through the DeLacy 's interactions. He slowly begins learning their language, and with the aid of some handily placed books such as Paradise Lost, Plutarch 's Lives, and the Sorrows of Werter, he delves into the culture, philosophy, and history of the human world. His speech becomes quite fluent and his manner most sophisticated. The story would have been completely different if Rick had not been able to speak; if he was just an indifferent, unintelligent, voiceless beast as the one represented in Boris Karloff 's version of Frankenstein. Instead he is extremely well versed and quite reasonable. In the way of intelligence, Rick is especially human. On page 118, Victor 's father tells him, "It is also a duty owed to yourself; for excessive sorrow prevents improvement or enjoyment, or even the discharge of daily usefulness, without which no man is fit for society." If Shelley implies here that usefulness and enjoyment are a testament to humanity, then it could also be argued in this view that …show more content…
He argues with Frankenstein so compassionately, that in the end, even Frankenstein will not refuse his request for a mate. Rick also show compassion when he saves a small girl from drowning (to be repaid with a bullet wound) and in performing chores for the De Lacey 's to ease their burdens. The De Lacey family acted more or less as Rick 's surrogate family. Their actions and interaction shaped his thoughts and being, and gave him hope to join society once again. What more could claim Rick 's humanity, than interacting and socializing with a member of the human society of which he was not yet a part of? His chance came one day when the blind father was left alone. Rick began his first real interaction with the man on page 158, and until the end, this interaction seemed very promising. After Rick explains some of his own grievances, De Lacey states on page 159: "I am blind, and cannot judge of your countenance, but there is something in your words which persuades me that you are sincere. I am poor and an exile; but it will afford me true pleasure to be in any way serviceable to a human

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