How Does Huck Finn Change Throughout The Novel

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In Mark Twain's, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Twain uses the relatable character, Huck, to work his way into the audience and sway a divided and morally awry country into brighter light. In this fun and exciting novel, Twain also uses Huck’s relationship with the reader to dive deep into the complex subjects. Huck changes drastically throughout his adventure but most importantly he learns that he always has a choice. Time and time again Huck is presented with morally challenging scenarios. Nevertheless, Huck time and time again goes within himself to prove that he always has a choice. Twain uses Huck’s journey to guide America forward out of their segregated state and uses Huck’s actions to show to an immoral country that regardless …show more content…
Huck looks up to Tom, a boy that is like Huck in many ways. However, also shows what Huck is missing on his own. Tom has a family, he is educated, and society persuades Huck to think that these missing things Tom has are what hinging his happiness. In result of this, Huck throughout the novel views Tom as a role model and what he wishes he was like. In our early introduction to Tom, he wants to start a gang that Huck joins. The gang was riddled with immoral, murderous rules. One rule stated that each member must have a family offered that would be killed if they disobeyed gang rules. Huck at his lowest point in the novel states, “...I offered them Miss Watson- they could kill her. (21). Tom proves like Pap that society can easily have a negative influence on someone. However, unlike Pap, Huck chooses to be around Tom and looks up to him. As society tells one that they should listen and learn from their parents. Society tells Huck to look up to Tom because he is educated and unlike Huck, has a family. Huck chooses Tom to be a role model and lets Tom corrupt him. Again Huck is a victim of society's influence causing to commit to actions he wouldn’t have otherwise agreed …show more content…
Twain consistently presents society as a group that wants to teach Huck to be immoral. Jim who society outcasts and dehumanizes teaches Huck to be a boy of high morals. Huck has to make choices on what to follow with so many forces pressing on him. Nevertheless, in the sight of adversity, Huck heavily considers turning Jim in as society wants him to do. When speaking of turning Jim in, Huck said, “Why, me. I couldn’t get that out of my conscience, no how nor no way. It got to troubling me so I couldn’t rest; I couldn’t stay still in one place” (91). Society is telling Huck that he is stealing property. Society is telling Huck that helping Jim retake his God-given freedom is unjust. Huck is taught that Jim is an immoral person and sticking with him makes him an immoral person as well. Huck feels that he is in the wrong. However, actions speak louder than words and when confronted with the opportunity to turn Jim in and conform to society; Huck decides to not turn Jim in. Huck learns from Jim and the contrast Jim is from the people around him. Jim’s different attitude towards life contrasts those of Pap and the rest of society. These contrasts strike a chord with Huck. Huck unknowingly realizes that Jim is better than society, causing Huck to continue with Jim. Huck follows his positive influences, disobeying society. However, Jim’s actions make Huck

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