Huckleberry Finn By The Waters Of Babylon Analysis

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In the infancy of humanity, rivers were great obstacles. They presented a new problem, new tools required in order to achieve a solution, and a new method of getting to that solution. That’s what Mark Twain and Stephen Vincent Benét brought with The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and By the Waters of Babylon respectively. In them the protagonists, Huck Finn and John son of John, overcome a series of obstacles in order to achieve the truth they desired . While both authors did an excellent job in the creation of an immersive world, By the Waters of Babylon paints a world eerily similar to our own. It enlightens us with topics that show how apparently close we are to a world where the Dead Places exist, and the world can be if we continue to …show more content…
Huck Finn brings around a new story every chapter, with subplots and sub subplots coming around every corner like a winding river. When the climax of Huck Finn does come, it’s as abrupt as “‘All right then, I’ll go to Hell’ - and tore it up… I shoved the whole thing out of my head; and said I would take up wickedness again, which was in my line, being brung up to it, and the other warn’t”. The 31 chapter rising action leads to this, a short peak. While short can be appreciated at times, Mr. Twain takes it a little too far, making it so short that it can be glanced over someone who isn’t being the most diligent in the story, with only a faint feeling of “this is important”. Along with that, Huck Finn falls with a well thought out, but seemingly a little bit long and unsatisfactory conclusion. This leads to believe that Mr. Twain just wrote to write at that point with none of the complexity as present in the first half of the book, leaving more desired. Babylon, on the other hand, has a constant writing style throughout, with a simple, but effective style used throughout. When at the height of the story, the tension is palpable as John delves deep into his dream where he realizes the truth about the gods. Afterward, you see how dazed by this John is, with him muttering the lines: “... My heart was perplexed and confused. I knew the reason for the Dead Places but I did not see why it had happened”. It brings a …show more content…
Babylon mainly emphasizes on the quest for the truth with phrases like “‘ Truth is a hard deer to hunt. If you eat too much truth at once, you may die of the truth. It was not idly that our fathers forbade the Dead Places’”. It shows that you want to move forward, you are the person who needs to be in control, not others. Huck Finn, on the other hand, has many little things on its checklist it wants to tick off by the time the reader is finished with the book. Sometimes it doesn’t always seem the most unbiased book while doing that, an example being the how it sometimes criticizes the Church for some of its ways of teaching, saying that during the aftermath from the sermon of brotherly love in the little Church in the Shepherdson- Grangerford affair was “... pretty ornery teaching… but everybody said it was a good sermon, and they talked about it over going home…”. This shows that people think that the Church is important, but the information isn’t relevant in their lives because they are mere riverfolk who can’t do such things, thus later battling it out in a scene that could’ve been taken out of a play. It is a note to the Church that these aren’t children to lecture, but adults that won’t just yield because you said to once. This is also in the same line of thought as the deer statement in Babylon, but also brings up the Church’s problems, which can be distracting to the main point of what

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