Invisibile Issues In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

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Invisibile Issues Through Society's Eyes Edgar Allen Poe once said, “Invisable things are the only realities.” Poe is saying that the things that are intangible are what matter most, such as in the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, where racism is the concept which society doesn’t see as a problem.Edgar Allen Poe once said, “Invisable things are the only realities.” Poe is saying that the things that are intangible are what matter most, such as in the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, where racism is the concept which society doesn’t see as a problem. Twain shows the internal point of view through 13 year old Huck Finn and his journey to escape society. Twain employs satire in order to critique society’s ignorance …show more content…
Initially, a boy wants to capture Jim for the two hundred dollar reward, which Huck wants to do at first when he thinks about the money.Twain shows how racism seems like it is invisble to society in this scene by the boy that Huck met saying, "Well, I reckon! There's two hunderd dollars reward on him. It's like picking up money out'n the road" (212). This proves that society has no recognition to the fact racism is a problem because Twain portrays a younger boy talking about how a human being in terms of how much money he worth. Het sees no a problem with the fact that he is trying to get the reward off of a person. Even Huck also fails to see the human being in Jim until they start to become good friends. Another way Twain demonstrates racism’s invisbility is when Huck contemplates whether to turn Jim in or not, eventually deciding against it when Jim says, "Dah you goes, de ole true Huck; de on'y white genlman dat ever kep' his promise to ole Jim" (90). This shows that racism is invisible in a different way because at this very moment Huck realizes that Jim is a human just like him. Huck doesn’t see Jim as a slave, but as a friend; the idea of slavery isinvisible to him until he realize that he means something to Jim. Twain strongly proves that society view racism as somewhat invisible especially through two young white boys. They have both grown up being taught to view African Americans in a negative way, to have absolutely no feelings for them, and to not accept them as being human. As young boys, they see no problem in treating a slave that way because slavery is a norm of society; therefore, to them it is

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