What Is The Transformation Of Huckleberry Finn

Decent Essays
“The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them.” – Mark Twain. One incredible book which is worth reading is The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain. The book is a bildungsroman, following the protagonist, Huckleberry Finn, as he evolves from an immature child to a levelheaded, although somewhat defiant, grown person. At the beginning of the novel, Huck follows the adults around him, adopting their value systems. Throughout the middle of the book, the protagonist develops his own set of morals that vary drastically from society’s. Huck defies the beliefs of the adults in his life by the end of the story. Huck Finn grows immensely throughout the novel, starting from a young immature brat …show more content…
The first of which is when he tells Mary Jane that the duke and the king are frauds. Huck, after lying his way through his childhood, finally realizes that, “the truth is better, and actuly safer, than a lie” (170). He understands the harm in lying. Twain famously said, “If you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember anything.” Huck’s epiphany leads him to become a better, more genuine person. Later, Huck writes a letter to Miss Watson, Jim’s owner. He tries to think of just cause to send Jim back to slavery, but Huck, “couldn’t seem to strike no places to harden [Huck] against him” (194). Huck appreciates Jim as a friend and a human being, choosing not to send the letter to Miss Watson. The protagonist develops a sophisticated value system, separate from his role models’ belief systems and separate from society’s standards. Comparing Tom and Huck, Huck seems much more mature than Tom. Even at the beginning of the novel this was true, but at the end, the difference in maturity is much more apparent. Tom is still pulling pranks and overcomplicating every scenario, while Huck practically deals with each situation, acting on his set of morals. The protagonist in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn develops his value system throughout the novel, maturing as a character and proving this book to be a perfect example of a bildungsroman. The story begins with Huck acting as an impish child, pulling pranks and lacking in morals. Continuing through the book, the main character develops a sense of right and wrong, making more mature decisions. Near the end of the novel, Huck makes several sensible choices, showing his highly developed value

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    At first, Huck is desensitized towards slavery, believing that black men like Jim must not escape from their masters no matter the reason, criticizing Jim for considering how to steal his children away from captivity: “Just see what a difference it made in him the minute he judged he was about free. It was according to the old saying, ‘Give a nigger an inch and he’ll take an ell’” (88). Initially, Huck does not view Jim as a person. but property that is running away. He even thinks that Jim takes things too far, never considering the pain Jim must be feeling, distanced from his children and wife.…

    • 1434 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Allingham does note all the uses of deceptions in the book that create a sense of lying and childishness, but he also needs to note how much the deceptions used in the book created the good person Huck ended up being. In my opinion, Twain was not trying to deceive the readers but show them how the young boy-like nature influenced him in his wrong doing and ended up proving a point that Huck was indeed growing up and changing the interpretation of himself over time. He no longer wanted to play jokes on people because he could see how lying and hurting someone was not as fun as it had seemed before and he did not want to lose Jim to an injury, especially one he had caused. As he develops more he realizes that lying is bad but there are times a white lie is needed to protect people he cares about. This is truly when you begin to see Huck develop moral reasoning when instead of lying to cover up what he had done, he began to lie to cover up for Jim.…

    • 1674 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Tom Sawyer lives more of a carefree life, while Huckleberry Finn lives a much more dark and daring one. As Tom Sawyer’s story develops, the reader learns that Tom is a troublemaker, but even after given a punishment, he is off again, getting into more trouble. For Tom, it’s all about the adventure. If the adventure…

    • 1304 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Huckleberry Finn, one of the most well known characters of all time, challenges and triumphs against the standards of social society during his time. Throughout the novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck grows up in many ways and learns the rights and wrongs of dealing with rules, laws, and people. He shows the importance of friendship, his willingness to get out of a bad situation, and how loyal he can be to someone who truly means something to him. Society has changed rapidly since the 1830’s, when this novel takes place. Huckleberry Finn’s dramatic change from the beginning of the book to the end of it shows his transformation into an almost completely different person.…

    • 1688 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Huck evolves and transforms from naïve to understanding society which reveals his coming of age and finding the truth of racism. As Huck goes through the story, he grows and changes his beliefs thus becoming a young adult. Huck’s naivety is evident in the first couple of chapters. He shows that he only cares about what is happening to him. That the only thing that matters is what is in his own little world.…

    • 761 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The book the adventures by Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain focus on the character Huck Finn and his journey to morality. Thesis: The three biggest impacts on Huck’s morality are emerging into the novel by living with a drunken and abusive father, being assisted with Jim to gain his own sense of morality, and him learning right and wrong throughout the book. By that I mean he learns how to make good decisions and bad decisions depending on the situation. One impact on Huck’s morality is trying to emerge into the book by living with his drunken abusive father. Huck did not look up to his father to figure out his sense of right or wrong.…

    • 497 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Morality is beliefs about what is right behavior and what is wrong behavior, and it is very hard to possess. Many critics have commented stating that Huckleberry Finn does not portray good morals in the last twelve chapters of the novel, and many have affirmed the idea that his moral growth resonates throughout his adventures. Huckleberry grows into an admirable character as seen through his actions associated with Jim’s freedom, his interaction with the Duke and Dauphin, and finally through his revelation of Jim’s humanity. Many readers believe that the last twelve chapters of the novel portrays Huckleberry as a un-admirable character. The last twelve chapters of the novel portray abusive and derogatory actions by Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry…

    • 1975 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In Charles Dicken’s Great Expectations, the main protagonist Pip, grows throughout the novel as he develops from a simple, noble, naïve young boy to a respected and matured gentleman. As Pip narrates the story of his youth and the life changing events that made him a wise and mature person, Pip is contemplating how the changes in his life are not only relying on a particular person or event. – unlike what other fictional stories and books contain. – Starting with the convict, to the experiences at the Satis House and his wealth, the constant changes in Pip’s life cause him to experience a bildungsroman, which concludes with Pip being a mature and sensible adult. Dicken’s created Pip as an illustration of one person’s growth to society.…

    • 1158 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Huck vs. Family A person’s family has the ability to make them a great or terrible person. In Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, relationships affect Finn in positive and negative ways. The beginning of the novel, portrays Huck as a very rebellious, rude and inconsiderate person. However, as the story develops, Huck transforms into an entirely different person. All of his relationships, improve one of his bad qualities and transform him into a new person.…

    • 2048 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Some of Huck’s lies, however, are beneficial such as when Huck save Jim’s life: “Say, boy, what 's the matter with your father....it ain 't nothing...honest” (87). The need for Huck to lie helps get what he wants such as lying that he’s “Mary Williams” in order to get valuable information. Unreliable narrators are usually inexperienced like Huck at the start of the story, but encouraging him to mature and finding their own identity. At the end of the book, Huck changes from lying carelessly to lying in a much more responsible…

    • 1818 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays