Hypocrisy In Huck Finn

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In Huck’s society, African-Americans are considered to be worth less than the dirt on their shoe. Huck had clearly wronged Jim, and an apology was in order; however, fifteen minutes pass by before he can spit the words out. Now, either the community has an issue with pride, or they are very hypocritical of what they preach to be true.
The widow is constantly preaching about “helping others” and how those who do this will be rewarded with “spiritual gifts”. These Christian morals, however, are not shown in her everyday life. The community as a whole disrespects and belittles African-Americans to make it known that they believe they are worthless. They do not help them when they are in need, and they have a tendency to make things worse for them. Yet African-Americans are still people, so shouldn’t the community of “do-gooders” help them? This is another excellent example of hypocrisy in the book.
This book is
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It seems as if the entire journey they had embarked on together was meaningless. Even though the whole situation makes Huck sick to his stomach out of guilt, he does it anyway. He knows that the decision he has made is not the right one, and he should not have turned him in, but he was too afraid of what might become of him that he didn’t care about what would happen to Jim. This is a heart-wrenching part of the story; however, it is a crucial piece to the overall theme of hypocrisy.
In this instance, Huck is referring to “civilization” as all of the horrid events he has witnessed. He has now realized how hypocritical his community is, and he wants nothing to do with this. He was finally come to peace in his mind about what is right and wrong, and he realizes that the culture he grew up in is definitely unethical. The things that they preached to be good and just were anything but that. He knows slavery is unrighteous and that anyone who believes it to be moral is a

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