Huck Finn Dialect

1786 Words 8 Pages
Mark Twain’s novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, has caused multiple difficulties in school readings. In 2011, the novel is modified so it could be accepted in today’s society. Stephen Railton, a professor at University of Virginia, published a version of the book that replaced that offensive word with “slave.” But, the novel is mostly banned for the use of a derogatory word, the “n” word. Many people argue that the novel portrays the way things were during that time period. People continuously look down on people who were enslaved in the novel’s time period. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn should be removed from the high school curriculum for its dreadful dialect and racist situations (the “n”word), the ending that represents substandard …show more content…
The dialect can be used in an offensive way from how Twain uses it to represent the runaway slave, Jim. The first time the reader meets Jim he is given a very negative description of Jim. The reader is told that Jim is illiterate,acts the same way as a child, not very intelligent and superstitious. However, Twain does represent how slaves acted back in the twentieth century. The dialect represents the setting of the novel, in the pre-Civil War deep South. Many people have also complained about Huck’s use of dialect. Huck’s dialect includes the “n” word. Jim and the millions of other slaves in the South were not permitted any formal education, they were never allowed to have independent thoughts and were abused daily. Huck even fooled Jim in chapter fifteen of the novel, “Well, den, I reck’n I did dream it, Huck; but dog my cats ef it ain’t de powerfulest dream I ever see. En I hain’t ever had no dream b’fo’ dat’s tired me like dis one,” (Twain 84). Huck deceived Jim into thinking the fog in their surroundings, was a dream, an imagination. Huck then realizes that Jim is a normal human being and is not just an African-American slave. Jim also has feelings and has some sense of intelligence within himself. “It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go, and humble myself to a “n” word; but I done it, and I warn’t ever sorry for it afterward, neither. I …show more content…
The way Huck and Jim discover the Duke and the Dauphin and the adventures and false information they have committed cand given are very unrealistic. In chapter twenty-five, Huck, Jim, the Duke, and the Dauphin even fool a family of a dead relative into providing them with coins and wealth, “Mary Jane straightened herself up... She says: “Here is my answer,” She hove up the bag of money and put it in the king’s hands, and says, “Take this six thousand dollars, and invest for me and my sisters any way you want to, and don’t give us no receipt for it,” (Twain 169). The family believed that the Duke and the Dauphin were family members from England and provided them with a great amount of money. Realistically, many would recognize family members, fake accents, and frauds. Another unrealistic situation is when Huck dressed up as a girl to go into town and discover news of the Jim and himself, “What might your name be?” “Sarah Williams.” “Where ‘bouts do you live? In this neighborhood?” “No’m Hookerville, seven mile below. I’ve walked all the way and I’m all tired out,” (Twain 55). Huck then continues to provide the lady with his inexperienced ways of taking action and mediocre acting by questioning the news for his whereabouts in the area, “Who done it?” We’ve heard considerable about these goings-on down in Hookerville, but we don’t know who ‘twas that killed Huck Finn.” “Well, I

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