Huck And Jim Character Analysis

Better Essays
Huck and Jim or Jim and Huck
In Mark Twain’s novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, readers follow a lonesome boy by the name of Huckleberry Finn. Huck after running away from his often absent, abusive, alcoholic father, goes down the Mississippi river to Jackson’s Island. While the citizens of Hannibal, Missouri believe he is dead, he is actually living in this safe haven for three days while “camp fire smoking, and feeling pretty well satisfied”. However without a father or authority figure and alienated from society, Huck becomes very lonely. Then he comes upon a runaway slave, Jim, who has the potential to fill Huck’s needs for a father; however, Huck struggles with this because of Jim’s race. Throughout the novel Huck’s view of Jim
…show more content…
I was ever so glad to see Jim. I warn 't lonesome now. I told him I warn 't afraid of HIM telling the people where I was. I talked along, but he only set there and looked at me; never said nothin” (53). His immediate reaction is of gratitude and relief for a companion, but as he talks along without Jim uttering a word the reader can already see a hierarchy, with Huck on top, being formed. Jim’s silence shows how he is apprehensive with this new addition of a white comrade, but smart enough to know that if he were to speak up, he may be turned in. Jim at first shows no emotions or speaks a word to Huck in order to protect himself. However, later on the island the reader can see occurrences of Jim being protective of Huck: "It 's a dead man. Yes, indeedy; naked, too. He 's ben shot in de back. I reck 'n he 's ben dead two er three days. Come in, Huck, but doan ' look at his face—it 's too gashly." (61-62). In saying so, Jim shows himself to be a caring, loving, gentle, and emotionally intelligent human being. Jim, really knowing that this body belongs to Huck’s real father but keeping that information to himself, becomes a protective figure for Huck. Later Huck …show more content…
In one instance Jim and Huck get seperated by fog and when they are reunited Jim says, “Goodness gracious, is dat you, Huck? En you ain’ dead—you ain’ drownded—you’s back agin? It’s too good for true, honey, it’s too good for true. Lemme look at you chile, lemme feel o’ you. No, you ain’ dead! you’s back agin, ‘live en soun’, jis de same ole Huck—de same ole Huck, thanks to goodness!” (93). Jim’s elation shows his absolute devotion and affection for Huck, yet Huck takes this time to play another trick on Jim making Jim believe that he dreamed the whole situation. His inclination to trick Jim demonstrates not only Huck’s childishness, but also demonstrates, more keenly, Huck’s callousness toward Jim, still stuck with his belief that Jim is racially inferior to him. Huck does not yet fully empathize with Jim or understand his emotion and affection towards him. After figuring out Huck’s trick Jim replies: “When I got all wore out wid work, en wid de callin’ for you, en went to sleep, my heart wuz mos’ broke ... En when I wake up en fine you back agin ... I’s so thankful. En all you wuz thinkin’ ‘bout wuz how you could make a fool uv ole Jim wid a lie.” (95). While rooted in affection, this comment shows Jim’s other side of a paternal figure, the side of discipline. Like any father, Jim is not as much angry with Huck as he is disappointed. Jim is not just upset with Huck for lying; he

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Huck tries to channel his inner Tom, and later on it hurts his feelings. “I haint seen no fog, nor no islands, nor no troubles, nor nothing.” (Twain, 113). Huck thinks that since Jim is uneducated he is gullible too. Jim, however cares about Huck so much he thought of Huck as one of his own children, he cried when Huck was gone. Jim is the kind of person that cares about everyone’s well being.…

    • 1291 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Huck’s views begin to change when he fools Jim into believing that he had never fallen off the raft and that Jim was just dreaming. Later on, Jim beats himself up trying to figure out if it was really a dream or not. Huck feels horrible for fooling Jim because he notices that Jim has only been good to him this whole time Huck feels like “[kissing Jim’s] foot…[because he is] so thankful [for Jim]” (Twain pg.86). He also apologizes because “[he knew it would make him feel good]” (Twain pg.86). This means that Huck felt horrible for fooling Jim that he would even kiss his feet so that Jim can forgive him.…

    • 1559 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In Huck’s time and place, the general public frowned upon those who cared about slaves and freedmen. Huck starts to see Jim as a decent human being and gains the maturity that allows him to also see Jim is, in reality, his equal. Huck, having befallen the fate of separation in the fog, finds Jim eventually, but plays it off as if he never left. Jim insists that he whooped to Huck to try to get him to come back. Huck, however, insists that Jim was dreaming.…

    • 1353 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Huck does not emphasize for Jim and therefore makes him looks like a fool. Huck then realizes that he has hurt Jim and he then begins to have respect and he starts to listen to him, therefore trusting him. After Huck realizes he has done wrong, he apologizes to JIM “It made me feel so mean that I could almost kiss his foot to get him to take me back. I worked myself up to go humble to a nigger and I done it, and I warn’t even sorry for it neither” (86). Through this apology, it shows that Huck is beginning to value friendships.…

    • 1401 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A sense of love and trust have never been present in Huck’s life until he met Jim. With distrust towards society and seeing all the things Jim does for Huck he begins to view Jim as a person. Even though Huck’s heart begins to tell him these things his conscience has been blinded by the ethical system which still makes him think again about Jim and at times stills believes that he is just someone’s…

    • 1176 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Huck, a naïve and unruly young boy, transforms into a noble character of generosity and kindness, ultimately living up to his moral promise. Although Huck himself chooses to help Jim, he is baffled when Tom, a "well brung up" person chooses to help him. This reveals Huck 's unsurety of his own decision, still perceiving it as a crime that requires the greatest punishment, eternal damnation. We see this when Huck questions Tom’s decision to help him, "Here was a boy that was respectable, and well brung up; and had a character to lose; and folks at home that had characters; and he was bright and not leatherheaded; and knowing, and not ignorant; and not mean, but kind; and yet here he was, without any more pride, or rightness, or feeling, than to stoop to this business, and make himself a shame and his family a shame, before everybody. I couldn’t understand it… "(292-293).…

    • 1145 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He is able to see things that other kids with a proper “upbringing” were not exposed to. Huck is a loyal person, he takes great pride in his dignity and his promises. During the majority of his voyage, Huck is burdened with the thought of turning Jim in and doing the right thing, although it is pressuring, Huck never strays away from his guidelines. For instance, the passage states that, “I was trying to make my mouth say the right thing and the thing, and go and write to that nigger’s owner and tell where he was; but deep down in me I knowed it was a lie- and He knowed it. You can’t pray a lie-I found that out” (Document E).…

    • 1366 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Huck Finn Raft Analysis

    • 1609 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Jim is upset not so much because Huck lied, but because Huck failed to imagine the consequences of his lies for Jim, emotionally, as he attempts to navigate unusual experiences in this new, quasi-free adventure with Huck. Thus, Jim expresses that his “heart wuz mos’ broke” because he thought he lost Huck, and was worried for him, seemingly in the same way that one family member would worry about another. Furthermore, Jim knows that Huck ultimately plays an instrumental role in Jim’s escape into the free states: being accompanied by a young, white, male definitely helps Jim’s chances. However, Jim’s melodramatic expressions towards Huck clearly indicate that Jim does not simply view Huck (ironic as this may sound) as a utility,…

    • 1609 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Again, Samuel does not fight back but realizes that the man had a right to his beliefs and standards. “At first he simply admitted that his wrongness had made him powerless--as it had made him powerless against Gilly-but eventually his mistake about the workman influenced his entire attitude. Snobbishness is, after all, merely good breeding grown…

    • 908 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Po’ little Johnny! It’s mighty hard; I spec’ I ain’t ever gwyne to see you no mo’, no mo’!”(167). This shows how caring Jim is towards his children, which contrasts with Pap, who does not care at all what happens to Huck. When Pap learns that Huck is literate, he responds disgracefully, saying “…they say; you can read and write. You think you’re better’n your father, now, don’t you, because he can’t?…

    • 1331 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays