Howard University Essay

1414 Words 6 Pages
Register to read the introduction… “In November 1866, shortly after the end of the Civil War, members of the First Congregational Society of Washington considered establishing a theological seminary for the education of African-American clergymen. Within a few weeks, the concept expanded to include a provision for establishing a University. Within two years, the University consisted of the colleges of Liberal Arts and Medicine. The new institution was named for General Oliver O. Howard, a Civil War hero who was both a founder of the University and, at the same time, commissioner of the Freedmen’s …show more content…
This was the perfect place for Howard University to become prominent to a distinguished academic status, partly because of its proximity to the seat of government and partly for the presence of immeasurable bountiful foundations, policy organizations and for the existence of an outsized, vigorous and affluent black population. Students within the university were very opinionated and voiced their opinions through student sit-ins, rallies and other movements. Howard University has played an important role in American History and the Civil Rights Movement on a number of occasions. Alain Locke, Chair of the Department of Philosophy and first African American Rhodes Scholar, authored The New Negro, which helped to usher in the Harlem Renaissance. (Wikipedia) Many students were participants of the “Freedom Ride”, such as Diane Nash, Rev. James Morris Lawson Jr., Rev. William Sloane Coffin Jr. and James Leonard …show more content…
Mordecai W. Johnson assumed the job of being the first black president of Howard in 1926 (Howard's second charter date).(Dyson) The school had no academic standing, less than 2,000 students attending and the funding stood at a little over half a million dollars. Dr. Johnson stayed the president of the University until 1960. During that time he accomplished “all schools and colleges, all fully accredited; 6,000 students; a budget of $8 million... a greatly enlarged faculty that included some of the most prominent black scholars of the day…the University’s enhanced academic status was the 1955 inauguration of graduate programs that had the authority to grant the PhD degree.”

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