How Does The Importance Of Being Ernest Reflect Morality

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Group 1, Question A Aristocrats of the Victorian era aimed at being perceived as extremely moral and proper; however, in the reality, the fact of being seen as moral by other members of society overshadowed being moral itself. Oscar Wilde in his “Importance of Being Ernest” satirizes the intent of people to be loved and admired for what they are not, “You look as if your name was Ernest. You are the most earnest-looking person I ever saw in my life” (Wilde 6). For Cecily and Gwendolen it is absolutely non-important who their admirers are actually as people, what they do, and what they like; the only thing that matter for them is that Jack and Algernon appear to be “Earnest”. To be “Earnest” means to comply with the Victorian ideals, which …show more content…
Another example of how “The Importance of Being Earnest” reflect superficiality in Victorian era culture is bunburying, which can be explained as making up an excuse in order to avoid anything a person does not wish to do. It would be considered externally rude for Algernon to merely say that he is not interested in dining with lady Bracknell; therefore, he does not show his reluctance in any possible way, but instead he lies his way out using his fictional ill uncle Bunbury to avoid her company. Thus, it is an example of being superficial and concealing one’s true feelings in order to fit social norms. Another minor example is how Algernon lies about promised to lady Bracknell cucumbers sandwiches that he eats all by himself, “I am greatly distressed, Aunt Augusta, about there being no cucumbers, not even for ready money” (Wilde 9). Being honest was emphasized in the Victorian culture; however, for Algernon honesty means nothing, but he is ready deceive to save his position in society. Therefore, the above-mentioned scenes are the examples of how Wilde treats Victorian superficiality in “The …show more content…
Although the painting is not as distinctively impressionistic as the works of Claude Monet, it is still undoubtedly a product of this genre. First, it captures reality; however, this reality is not glum or unfortunate as the one of paintings from the era of Realism. On the contrary, it is an optimistic scene that depicts people who are happy in each other’s company; even the name of the painting itself suggests that it is about celebration. Besides, people on the picture, judging by their clothes, furniture, and food, are most likely from the middle class, who was the main objective in the works of impressionists. The light on the picture emphasizes people’s faces and gives another layer to the colors on the picture, in general. Tender colors and the happy faces of people add the feeling of peace and tranquility to the picture. Moreover, “Hip, Hip, Hurrah!” was not painted using traditional Renaissance techniques such as sharp and precise counters; Krøyer rather used brushstroke, which are, in the sense, are a perfect way to show his feelings. Among other things can also be noted the difference between depiction of women and men. All the men are cheering on their feet while women remain seated. This fact may show that women were not supposed to be as loud and expressive as men and behave as quiet as possible. Moreover, one of the women has a child on her left; thus, even when

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