Module 1-4 Analysis

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The housing we live today, the city environment we live today, the transportation we take today and even the public services we take as granted today were all developed when time goes by with adequate urban planning. In module 1-4, the course director Lewis Code showed us the historical growth and development of urban places so we can better understand the reason behind of all these changes around the cities over years. For the rest of this essay, I will analyze the four important concepts I have learned in module 1-4 and link the discussions with the impact of technology on urban places. The four concepts are: industrial revolution, transportation, modern Central Business District and modern city.

Lewis first shows us Industrial Revolution
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Society stratification had been developed into more categories than pre-industrial. As the cities grew, people faced more problems in pollution, disease and crime so the municipal government has been created to regulate the city. Technology was seen as the solutions to fix all these problems causing by city revolution. Lewis mentioned we must first recognize the history of the urban places revolution that impacted our present day city; otherwise we would not be able to understand how technology transforms our city in terms of structure and function of urban places. Then Lewis discussed about the transportation innovations which is essential in trade functions and the outward urban development from the core of the city. In the video “Arteries of New York City”, we can see that transportation innovations allow people to live in suburbs but work in the core of the city. Many infrastructures had been built to accommodate different transportations which require adequate planning. Besides moving people out of the core of city, transportation innovations had also solved the problem of traffic jams. If all vehicles go on the street and the city’s space is limited, there would be no room for vehicles to

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