How Does Steinbeck Make Lennie's Death Seem Inevitable in 'of Mice and Men'?

1800 Words Jun 14th, 2013 8 Pages
How does Steinbeck make Lennie's death seem inevitable in 'Of Mice and Men'?

Of Mice and Men, published by John Steinbeck in 1937, is set in the Salinas Valley of California during the Great Depression.The novels two main characters, George and Lennie, embody the American struggle to survive the Depression, but the novel is timeless because it captures the personal isolation and suffering present in the land of opportunity. During the last scene George tells Lennie to take off his hat and look across the river while he describes their farm. He tells Lennie about the rabbits, and promises that nobody will ever be mean to him again. “Le’s do it now,” Lennie says. “Le’s get that place now.” George agrees. He raises Carlson’s gun, which
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It's just in their head. They're all the time talkin' about it, but it's jus' in their head.” Chapter 4.
Again it signifies the migrant workers of the time, searching for work and never losing hope and always having the american dream in mind. The thought that keeps them going is that one day they'll make enough money and have land of their own, but the Great Depression was really tough and that just didn't happen to everyone who wished for it.
The American Dream is a dream of a land in which life should be better, richer, fuller and with opportunity for each. It is a dream of social order in which each man and woman should be able to achieve the fullest stature of which they are capable of, and be recognized for what they are, regardless of the circumstances of birth or position.
George and Lennie's main ambition is to "get the jack together" purchase a few acres of land they can call their own, "an' live off the fatta the lan'. This is their dream and their dream, however, cannot exist without friendship. The constant repetition of the way things will be is what keeps the dream alive in Lennie. George needs Lennie just as much as Lennie needs him, which is apparent at the end of the novel. When George kills Lennie, he also kills the friendship, which results in the death of the dream within him.
All the characters wish to change their lives in some fashion, but none are capable of doing so; they all have dreams, and it is only the dream that varies from person to

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