How Does Life Events Affect Indecision

1878 Words 8 Pages
This study focuses on the effects of life events on the decision-making abilities. I hypothesized that the following variables would have a significant effect on indecision: number of close friends, Greek life affiliation, relationship status, age, seriousness of relationship, number of moves as a child. Surveys and demographic sheets were randomly distributed to undergraduate UNL students and acquaintances that were recruited. None of the variables showed a significant effect on the indecision and double checking ratings, suggesting that life events in general do not greatly impact a person’s ability to make decisions. Moreover, future research that accounts for personal experience may explain why the effect of life events was not significant …show more content…
People who spend more time ruminating decisions are also shown to have more concrete thoughts, unlike depressed individuals who tend to partake in abstract thinking. Indecision may also be an integral component of developing an identity, as contemplation allows individuals to reach present, rational decisions. I hypothesize that people with more close friends will be more likely to have difficulty with indecision. Comparatively, people who are affiliated in Greek life (fraternity or sorority) will have greater difficulty making decisions. Additionally, I hypothesize increased indecision for people who are not in a romantic relationship. As age increases, I predict that difficulty with making decisions will decrease. It is also hypothesized that it will become more difficult to make decisions when people are in serious relationships. Finally, the more times a person has moved as a child, the more difficulty they will have making …show more content…
People with more close friends (M = 7.55, S = 10.44) showed no greater difficulty with decision making compared to people who reported less close friends (M = 2.23, S = 1.57), r = .03, p = .503. Thus, there is no support for the research hypothesis, as people with more close friends are not significantly likely to have difficulty with indecision. My second hypothesis was that people who are in a fraternity or sorority would have greater difficulty with decision-making. People in a fraternity or sorority (M = .18. S = .38) showed no greater difficulty making decisions (M = 2.23, S = 1.57) than Independent people, F(1, 526) = .18, p = .671, Mse = .444. As Greek people showed no greater difficulty making decisions than Independent people, there is no support for the hypothesis. I also hypothesized that there would be increased indecision for people who are not in a romantic relationship. Indecision (M = 2.23, S = 1.57) did not significantly vary between people who are and who are not in a romantic relationship (M = 1.52, S = .50), F(1, 525) = .24, p = .625, Mse = .602. Considering that people in romantic relationships were equally as likely as those not in a romantic relationship to have difficulty making decisions, there is no support for the

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