Women's Right To Vote

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The right to vote, down to its core, has had an illustrious history here in the United States of America. More specifically, women gained the right to vote less than one century ago. Upon the ratification of the 19th Amendment in August of 1920, women were now able to have a say their governance. It was how women gained the right to vote that has made a lasting impact. Not only did they overcome stereotypes, but they also exited their proper “sphere” in society. Even though some did not believe women should have a say in government, women eventually gained the right to vote in the early twentieth century by claiming a violation of natural right and challenging their appropriate societal “sphere;” in addition, women had to overcome their perception …show more content…
Even before the right to vote was won, women were already beginning to be more prominent in their society. By being out and about working in a factory or office, women were seen as becoming a more prevalent part of the workforce. Even though women still oversaw all domestic duties, they were not solely limited to the household. For instance, due to a new sort of leisure activities throughout the U.S. women, in some states were seen shopping for food and other necessities. As a matter of fact, some women did not even marry and the divorce rate was steadily increasing. Now, women were college educated and highly qualified to pursue jobs outside traditionally perceived norms. In addition, women’s clubs were increasing in size and number as a reform force. These included the National Association of Colored Women, the Women’s Trade Union League. All of these organizations were created and maintained in order to establish more rights for women. An overseer, the General Federation of Women’s Clubs was also created with hundreds of separate women’s clubs under this organization. In all of these ways, women were totally contradicting previous conceptions of their societal role. In order to win the right to vote, women went beyond stereotypes to show that they were capable of a say in government. This is most definitely the …show more content…
Even today, an Equal Rights Amendment has yet to be passed and women still are not equal to men in some respects. For instance, males and females of the same exact job still do not get paid the same. Women still have more battles to fight, however, women’s suffrage was a major win in the war. The 19th Amendment passed in 1920 guaranteed women’s suffrage across the nation. Now, that does not mean total equality, but that is a huge improvement even from a century beforehand. Women’s suffragists had a monumental impact on the world we live in today by advocating for the right to vote. They had to overcome so much, mainly the traditional views of women and their extremely antiquated and sexist societal sphere. Female suffrage is positive, however, it was difficult for those advocating that to convince such radical opposers of a women’s say in their governance. However, all obstacles are meant to be overcome and with the passing of the 19th Amendment, the UNited States took a monumental step towards equality that would continue to improve the country as a

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