Racist Oppression Of Black Women Analysis

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1) How does the racist oppression of enslaved Black Women's bodies within the American White Racial Frame transverse through space and time?

Racial oppression and viewpoints of black women and their bodies as it relates to racial framing extends to the thoughts, treatment and opinions of how one relates to importance of black women bodies. How are their bodies viewed? Are their bodies valued and sexually appreciated or are they deemed less than because of the desire to devalue and hyper sexualized black women let alone men. It is my belief that the enslavement occurs the moment one chooses to justify whiteness as being superior by representing blackness as less than attractive, under educated and less than equal than their white peers.
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The black female has often been described as a “survivor” because she was able to establish some form of autonomy within the community. This complicated role of homemaker was rooted in grounded in racism. It has been described as a patriarchal tradition based out of African seen as or referred to as a biological destiny, which could be seen to compliment and continue the perpetuation of inferiority. Historically, we’ve paid a lot of attention the role and the resistance that men played during the resistance but woman helped to shape and mold the resistance throughout slavery.

4) How does Black women become the centralized force within the Black community? How did/do they create autonomy where the foundation always shifting?

The complexity of the black women role in being a force in the black community stems from the beginning as she was expected to cook, clean and raise the children. While the goal of the slave owner was to cast the black female in the role of beginning inferior to a white women, it provided stability within the community as a person designated as an anchor within the community. The passages described “slave labor” as only being meaningful to the slave community. It further describes the labor as a driving force to some autonomy for her and
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As described in the passages, annulled occurred when a women captured the freedom that was thrust upon them and functioned side by side with their man in the field suffering the same abuses as their men suffered from the slaves master. The passages described resistance as a survival tool because it allowed the slave to continue as a survivor and that by itself was considered an act of resistance. Annulment was not achieved by action that the slaves committed that were similar to their males but actions of the slave master help to convey equality of oppression through labor and whipping.

6) How were Black women role in resistance erased? How did they resist?

Because of the success that woman had as fighter alongside their men, it meant that a new tactic would be tried to thwart the process of freedom and resistance. As female slaves continue to fight for freedom, the slave master attempted to suppress resistance through hanging, burning and whipping. Ultimately, the slave owner was reduced to sexually assaulting the women because of the desire to maintain the purity of white woman. The goal was reduce the black woman to an unwilling concubine. The passage described the goal to force her body “resistance to be broken “through rape and terrorist on her mate. The goal was to impact the woman and male. The goal was to have the males think about their inability to stop the sexual attacks were

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