Cult Of Womanhood

Improved Essays
Many women fought tirelessly to gain equal rights with men and continued to do so today. In 1893, New Zealand was the world’s first country to grant women the right to vote. Only after World War I did other countries grant women’s suffrage. In 1918 in Britain, women over the age of thirty won the right to vote. In 1920, the United States granted women, both white and black, over the age of twenty-one the right to vote. Along with that, women also gained the rights and responsibilities of citizenship that men had through the 19th Amendment in the U.S constitution. In 1928, suffrage was extended to women in the United Kingdom over the age of twenty-one. In the 1940s, in France, Belgium, and Italy, women were granted full voting rights, …show more content…
During the 1820s and 1830s, most states granted all white men equal rights regardless of their income, and how much property they owned. At the same time, women played prominent roles in reform groups such as temperance clubs, religious movements, moral-reform societies, and the anti-slavery organizations. Meanwhile, historians believed in the “Cult of True Womanhood”. The “Cult of True Womanhood” was the idea of what they thought a “true” woman was, which was that a “true” woman was always a submissive, devoutly religious wife and mother, who was exclusively concerned with the household, and her family. All of these events made women contemplate about what it meant to be a woman and a citizen of the United …show more content…
Some groups were: the War Manpower Commission (which alerted women for jobs available because most men were at the war), the Women 's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC), the Women 's Army Corps (WAC), the women’s sector of the Coast Guard (SPARS), the women’s branch of the Navy called the “Women Appointed for Voluntary Emergency Service” (WAVES), the Women 's Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron (WAFS), the Marine Corps Women 's Reserve (MCWRS), the Women 's Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron (WAFS) , and the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPS). World War II’s influence on women’s status was dramatic. Over six million women worked actively in the workforce, filling positions in factories, and working on farms. Also, over three million women worked for the Red Cross, and over two hundred thousand women served in the military. These were jobs held exclusively for men before the war. But after the war was over, women were forced by society to become a housewife again. Despite this, women continued to fight for their rights in the Women’s Rights

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Without her sacrifices and accomplishment, the passing of the Nineteenth Amendment and influx of independent women in the 1920s and later would may have not occurred for many more years. Thus, Susan B. Anthony’s revolutionary work for the women’s rights movements and for equal rights in general should be recognized with a place in the U.S Hall of Fame. A vote for Susan B. Anthony for the U.S. Hall of Fame is a vote for all American women and their countless…

    • 1747 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Women have fought to be considered equal for an extended period of time in history. To this day, women are still fighting for their rights. The women’s rights movement started primarily in the 1920’s in the United States. One of the goals of the movement was to let women vote: women’s suffrage. This influenced the era of the 1920’s by showing that women had a voice and could stand up for equality.…

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Throughout history, group that are not in the category of heterosexual, white male have always had to fight for the basic rights. The birth of feminism is one of the most important parts of American History and has aided America to truly be “the land of the free.” This time in American history has so much value that can help modern day America realize the importance of not denying anyone their rights. Like many other unfairly treated groups, the fight for women’s suffrage was a long fight, yet nevertheless, women won and it is a critical part of American History. Through the Women’s Rights movement, many other advancements for the equality of all people occurred. Women are not the only group to have tirelessly fought for their American rights.…

    • 1452 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    When you think of equal rights you normally think about pay equality, educational equality, and protection under the law, but often the right to vote is very understated. One person who devoted her entire life to gaining the same rights as men was Emmeline Pankhurst. Within gaining the same rights as men her main focus was gaining the right to vote. It was through the militant acts that Emmeline and her suffragettes were able to gain the right to vote for women. The beginning of Emmeline’s movement started with the creation of the Women 's Social and Political Union (W.S.P.U) in 1903 (Rollyson 325).…

    • 919 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    New responsibilities on the home-front pushed women to contribute to the war effort by making goods for the military. “In the North, 200,000 women volunteered to work in relief agencies that sent a stream of clothing, food packages, and hospital supplies to the front”(Barney 1). While men were away, it was the responsibility of women to produce and send resources to the military. During the Civil War women on the home-front contributed a large part of their time to the war effort. With most of the men in the military, women that were rich, poor, from the North or the South had to be responsible for their household(Tendrich 48).…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    World War One helped the role of women to change from mothers to munition workers. These women saw many opportunities in the workforce as the men left for war. Many women worked in munition factories that helped prepare weaponry for the war. Several women worked long shifts in bad conditions, which they were never used to. However, they were determined to work because they were finally able to do work to prove themselves to be as capable as men.…

    • 1307 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Woman suffragist, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, declared that “all men and women are created equal.” (Keller, 598.) She had based her ideas on the Declaration of Independence. (Barber, 193.) From then on, thousands of people participated in the movement for women’s rights. Much of their effort was focused on women’s suffrage and securing voting rights for women.…

    • 1343 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Once Anthony and Stanton died before women could get the chance to vote other abolitionists took charge and still fought for women 's rights. At first voting was only in specifically states but then finally spreaded to the whole US. The amendment passed in both the house and the senate making it possible for women to…

    • 1412 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    During the civil war era, women were looked at very differently. They were mainly looked at as people to take care of the kids, and the house. Even they didn 't realize how independent they could become. After the war started, the had to take new roles, find jobs, and prove to men and others they could do more than take care of the house, and children. While men were away from home fighting in the war, women had to keep the man’s income alive to survive.…

    • 1162 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The United States entered the World War II after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Women power again was in demand and women's roles continued to change tremendously. In America Wars prior to World War II, there had been a discussion and opposition to using women in the armed forces. As men went off to World War II, women were needed for non-combat jobs such as switchboard operators, telegraphers, mechanics, and drivers. More than one hundred thousand women served in the women's Army Corps later became known as the Women's Army Corps, and also joined the United States Navy.…

    • 580 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays