How Did The Commercial Revolution Affect European Economy

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The financial crisis Europe faced during the twelfth and thirteenth century created the Commercial Revolution and significant changes in Europe’s economy. While traditional trading was common before this era, the revival of commerce during this time substantially altered the economics of Europe. Cities were able to accumulate wealth through new methods, and this set the stage for Europe’s growth and development economically and politically. Prior to the revolution, Europe encountered several economic issues, but with a wide expansion of growth during the Commercial Revolution, Europe transformed financially in trade and investments, politically in many cities, and most importantly created wealth in cities across Europe. Problems in Europe …show more content…
In Northern Italy and in the Northwest of France, a new upbringing in their towns was seen, as trade and manufacturing centers began to open (“Medieval Trade”). With the transportation of these goods, several cities took it upon themselves to collect money on sales and transportations of these items. Tolls were added to many bridges, roads, and canals that were used to trade goods (Durant 614). Many cities evolved into busy trade routes, creating a great source of income across Europe (“Medieval Trade”). As a result, peace was created between citizens and their towns, leading to an increase in population and agriculture (McKay 304). In addition, the economy started to develop into a free market. The focus of the market became supply and demand, which played a significant role in trade (“Bank” 2). Cities across Europe removed international trade restrictions in the first step of this process (Durant 614). Over the course of the late twelfth century, these changes were made to several European cities, triggering the start of the Commercial Revolution, ultimately expanding economies in …show more content…
These events tended to last six to seven weeks and were created by merchants in the Middle Ages. Fairs would cater to wholesale and international trade across Europe (Durant 614). Many fairs took place around the Baltic and Northern Seas, including major events in cities such as Champagne, Bar-Sur-Aube, Provins, and Troyes (Durant 614; “Medieval Trade”). Businessmen used fairs to their advantage, as well. They would create inns, stables, and banking institutions to serve people as they attended these fairs (“Medieval Trade”). These large trading events brought a big source of wealth for the businessmen trading at the fairs, as well as the countries that held them. In France, a big part of their wealth was contributed by fairs taking place in their cities (Durant 615). The wealth generated at fairs was an ultimate outcome of the Commercial

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