Diane Nash: The Global Civil Rights Movement

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Many do not know that 15-year old Claudette Colvin was the first African American who refused to give up her seat to a group of Caucasian people. Being too young and too dark-skinned she was never recognized as the leader who started the Civil Rights Movement. After her arrest, she became pregnant by a much older and married man, and civil rights leaders thought that it would not help but hamper the African American community in their rise for equality. Nine months later, Rosa Parks, a 42- year old light-skinned seamstress, was arrested for the same charge. Civil rights leaders took this as the perfect opportunity to initiate the worldwide Civil Rights Movement. No one knew that a movement similar to this would start 57 years later when an …show more content…
With this paralyzing fear, many would have fled the scene, but not Diane Nash. She was too determined to reach her goal despite all the odds. Unlike the legendary Civil Rights Movement, the Black Lives Matter Movement took on a more violent and chaotic approach. After the recent homicides of young black teens across the nation, a group of African American women were fed up with the madness and decided to create The Black Lives Matter Movement. Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza, and Opal Tometi are three well-known African American women initiated this renowned movement that has evoked many young and old to join and protest for the unjust homicides of young black teens. It all started February 26, 2012 in Sanford, Florida a 17-year old black teen Trayvon Martin was killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer named George Zimmerman. This incident immediately soared across the nation, causing many to rise up and take a stand. In one article, it discusses a few of the many protestors who took a stand to seek justice. After Zimmerman was acquitted of the second-degree murder, one particular man named Devonne Lindsey was infuriated by the Supreme Court 's final decision. He took …show more content…
It is the evident that the two movements involve the lives of African Americans who seek justice and equality. Like the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Lives Matter Movements protestors too marched along the streets hand-in-hand displaying a powerful indestructible bond which grabbed the attention of political leaders. In one article, an eighteen- year old girl named Laurell Glenn thinks of The Black Lives Movement as The Civil Rights Movement of her generation (SOURCE). She joined in a peaceful rally for Freddie Grey to prove that the youth of Baltimore are not delinquents but are young people who actually care about their city. In like manner, African Americans involved in the Civil Rights Movement courageously took a stand not to evoke violence but to obtain equality and to show respect while doing it. Today, there are some who still believe in nonviolent protest to achieve their goal like their grandparents or great-grandparents did long ago. Then and now, African Americans have had a hard time trying to express the true meaning of racism in America because some whites do not understand the actual feeling of how hard it is being black in America. In another article, Amira Soubiane, a student at the University Of Pittsburgh states, “I experience racism every day, and I expect [others] to understand it, but that’s really

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