How Did Susan B Anthony Affect Society

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Even though Susan B. Anthony may have passed away, her courage to stand up for women still continues to spread. She was a very influential person due to her accomplishments in the field of women’s rights. She grew up in a politically active family and was raised a Quaker. They believed everyone should have the right to be treated equally. Together they worked to end slavery and named it the abolitionist movement. An article mentions that at the age of 17, she was collecting anti-slavery petitions. As she grew older she felt inspired and knew she had to do something about women not having any rights.
Anthony affected society in a positive way she made it possible for women to be included in the development of our nation. She began giving speeches around the country to convince others to support a woman’s right to vote. In 1851, she met Cady Stanton at an anti-slavery meeting she and Cady became instant friends, together they fought for change and equality. In 1868 along with Stanton's help, Susan was able to publish her first co-written article about women and African American rights. It also talked about politics, the labor movement and finance.
Over the years Susan struggled through
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Even though Susan B. Anthony has passed she is remembered for making it possible for women to be who we are today. In 1920 the 19th amendment, otherwise known as the “Susan B. Anthony” amendment, granted the right to vote to all U.S. women over the age of 21. Anthony made a big impact on America. Because of her, women can now vote. Many women are thankful that Susan spoke up for what she believed. If she didn’t stand up for women’s rights, who would? She was a big part of the woman suffrage movement which helped all woman gain rights just like everyone else. Susan has been an important part of society if it weren't for her who knows if the woman would have any rights

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