Great Awakening Religion

1262 Words 6 Pages
Historians have long argued about which factors greatest impact the formation of society. Some believe that it is shaped by political goals, others think it is economic, and others think it religious. In terms of the formation of American history, the evidence is overwhelming for religion being the greatest factor. Religion was present as a forming factor since the first Native Americans arrived in the United States and continued to shape history through the Great Awakening. Although political and economic factors did play a part, religion played a primary role. Religion began to shape American history in 28,000 B.C. to the 1700s. During this time period Native Americans crossed the Bering Land Bridge from Asia into the Americas. The Native …show more content…
Although many colonies were founded by English settlers to gain religious freedom, these settlements wanted religious freedom for themselves, not other religions. This lead to disputes between the colonies and their religious dissenters and, eventually, the banishment of these dissenters. One such individual was a Puritan woman named Anne Hutchinson. This woman believed that she was allowed to counsel people in the Word because she was called to by God. The following excerpt from Anne Hutchinson’s trial displays the intolerance of the Puritan society: “Mrs. Hutchinson, you are called here as one of those who have troubled the peace of the commonwealth and the churches here” (RTAP, 22 “The Trail of Puritan Dissenter Anne Hutchinson”). Some dissenters, such as Roger Williams, were banished and created their own settlements. Roger Williams was a Puritan dissenter who founded the colony of Rhode Island. These dissenters changed the shape of American history. Rhode Island was a successful colony and grew until it reached statehood. Without the religious influences of the time period, America would not have the same states that it has in modern …show more content…
This, surprisingly, had a religious aspect. When slaves first arrived in the Americas, they were primarily Muslim. The colonists abided under the rule that a Christian could not enslave their fellow Christians. However, as time progressed, some of the slaves converted to Christianity. This raised the question “can you still own a slave who is a Christian?” This lead to the legislative decisions that Christina slaves were still slaves. This was a controversial religious act at the time, and paved the way for future religious acts in the leadership of the colonies and, eventually, the

Related Documents